be crystal clear

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be crystal clear

1. Of a thing or image, to be strikingly clear or clean. The picture on this new high-definition TV is crystal clear! The skies at the top of the mountain were just crystal clear.
2. Of information or communication, to be very easy to understand and not vague or ambiguous. A: "You have to drop this package off by 5 PM sharp, or it won't get delivered. Is that clear?" B: "Yep, it's crystal clear." A good lecturer is crystal-clear in class, but a great one makes the lessons engaging too.
See also: clear, crystal

crystal clear

1. Of a thing or image, strikingly clear or clean. Sometimes hyphenated when used as a modifier before a noun. The picture on this new high-definition TV is crystal clear! The crystal-clear skies at the top of the mountain afforded a spectacular view of the whole state down below.
2. Of information or communication, very easy to understand; not vague or ambiguous. Sometimes hyphenated when used as a modifier before a noun. A: "You have to drop this package off by 5 PM sharp, or it won't get delivered. Is that clear?" B: "Crystal clear." A good lecturer provides crystal-clear lessons in class, but a great one makes them engaging.
See also: clear, crystal

crystal clear, be

Also, be clear as crystal. Be easy to understand, have a very obvious meaning. For example, The directions for installing the door are crystal clear, or Her intentions are clear as crystal. Allusions to crystal's very high degree of transparency have been made since the 15th century.
See also: crystal

crystal clear

1 completely transparent and unclouded. 2 unambiguous; easily understood.
See also: clear, crystal

ˌcrystal ˈclear

very easy to understand; completely obvious: After Anne was late for the third time in a week, her boss made it crystal clear that it must not happen again. OPPOSITE: (as) clear as mud
See also: clear, crystal

be

/get on (one's) high horse
To be or become disdainful, superior, or conceited.

crystal clear

Transparently obvious. This simile (clear as crystal) dates from biblical times. In the Book of Revelation the writer describes the great city of Jerusalem as “having the glory of God; and her light was like unto a stone most precious, even like a jasper stone, clear as crystal” (21:11). The term appealed to numerous medieval poets and crops up in their ballads. By the time Dickens (in Edwin Drood, 1870) and Arthur Conan Doyle (in The Resident Patient, 1893) used it, it was a cliché.
See also: clear, crystal