beguile (someone) with (something)

(redirected from beguile us with)

beguile (someone) with (something)

To captivate someone with something. Peter beguiled the audience with the exciting tales of his world travels.
See also: beguile

beguile someone with something

to charm or fascinate someone with something. She beguiled her date with tales of her luxurious lifestyle. He spent the evening beguiling her with stories of the Old West.
See also: beguile
References in periodicals archive ?
liked today because they not only beguile us with beautiful costumes and the spell binding romance of the Regency period, but they show us that whilst the manners might have changed, human nature essentially hasn't.
Much like the child who observed that the Emperor, far from being bedecked in the accoutrements of his office was bereft of clothing, or what the Buddhist reveres as beginner's mind, Wittgenstein maintained a keen ear for what was actually said, how it was said, in what context the words were spoken and, in short, first drew our attention to the vast hurly-burly of language which both grants us the ability to speak profound truths from the heart, but can also confuse and beguile us with fine sounding phrases that return to the tinkling brass of unconsidered opinion.
Now that Morrissey appears to be exclusively transfixed on protecting the rights of root vegetables and shouting at anyone who comes within two feet of a sausage, rather than being spokesperson for a generation of disaffected social outsiders, the door is open for a romantic heart-string tugger to beguile us with their metaphysical poetry.
They beguile us with a Hollywood-like promise of amazing powers while at the same time repel us by the fear of the unknown and the speed with which they rush by in the ever-changing tides of technology.
With avant-garde vitality and expressionistic intensity, artists like Natan Altman, Robert Falk, Ignaty Nivinsky, Isaac Rabinovich and Alek-sander Tyshler beguile us with their angular drawings of sets and costumes for acclaimed productions such as Solomon Ansky's 1922 The Dybbuk.
Mr Branson should get his fundamentals right before trying to beguile us with expensive television advertising.