been there, done that


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been there, done that

A set phrase used to acknowledge that one has done or experienced something before, either as a form of dismissal or of empathy. Whitewater rafting? Been there, done that. Let's do something more extreme! A: "I got back to my car a mere three minutes after the meter expired, and I still got a parking ticket!" B: "Ugh, been there, done that."
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been there, done that

See also: been, done, that

been there, done that

COMMON People say been there, done that to show that they themselves have had an experience that someone is talking about. Rick wants to go backpacking in India, but I've been there, done that. Divorce? Been there, done that. Note: People sometimes say been there, done that, got the T-shirt to emphasize the expression. `I've tried so many diets in my life.' — `Oh yeah, been there, done that, got the T-shirt.' Note: This expression is sometimes used to show that you do not find the thing being talked about interesting because you have already experienced it.
See also: been, done, that

been there, done that

used to express past experience of or familiarity with something. informal
This is often used as a flippant expression of boredom or world-weariness. A late 20th-century elaboration parodies the blasé tourist's attitude to experience: been there, done that, got the T-shirt .
1996 United Church Observer Having no partner to pick up after me—been there, done that—I tend to, well, let things accumulate.
See also: been, done, that

ˌbeen ˈthere, ˌdone ˈthat

(informal) used to show that you think a place or an activity is not very interesting or impressive because you have already experienced it: Not camping again! Been there, done that, got the T-shirt.
See also: been, done, that

Been there, done that

verb
See also: been, done, that

been there, done that

I’ve had this experience and I’m bored with it. The implication of this relatively new and seemingly worldweary statement is, why bother to repeat something I’ve seen or done. However, it is also used as an expression of empathy, as in “You’ve offered to take care of the children for a week? Been there, done that.” The phrase dates only from the early 1980s and at first referred to tourism and sightseeing, but soon was extended to just about any activity. Moreover, it became overused so quickly that it became a cliché virtually in a decade and a half. Also see seen one, seen them all.
See also: been, done, that
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