be out of it

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be out of it

1. To be sedate, confused, or disoriented; to be, feel, or seem disconnected from reality. I was really out of it after working that 16-hour shift on Saturday. I think something is bugging John because he's been really out of it lately. It's like he's walking around in a haze.
2. To be heavily intoxicated by drugs or alcohol, especially to the point of becoming unconscious, nonsensical, or out of control. I think someone might have spiked Jack's drink with some kind of drug because he's really out of it all of a sudden. Jane is a lightweight. Only one or two beers and she's totally out of it.
3. To not be aware of or knowledgeable about something; to not be included or participating in something. Said especially of a particular trend, group, or activity. My dad is so out of it. Doesn't he know that wearing socks with sandals looks ridiculous? Everyone's been playing this new Japanese card game at school, but I'm out of it because I can't afford all the accessories for it.
See also: of, out

be/feel ˈout of it/things

not be/feel part of a group, a conversation, an activity, etc: I didn’t know anybody at the party so I felt a bit out of it really.
See also: feel, of, out, thing
References in classic literature ?
There were pears and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers' benevolence to dangle from conspicuous hooks, that people's mouths might water gratis as they passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling, in their fragrance, ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shufflings ankle deep through withered leaves; there were Norfolk Biffins, squab and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently entreating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten after dinner.
When Mr Sparkler was admitted to this closing audience, Mr Merdle came creeping in with not much more appearance of arms in his sleeves than if he had been the twin brother of Miss Biffin, and insisted on escorting Mr Dorrit down-stairs.