beef

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beef

1. noun, slang A source of disagreement; a feud. What is her beef with me? I'm always nice to her! The beef between the two rappers escalated with the latest diss track.
2. noun, slang A charge against someone. I'm fine with you working late, but you didn't call and let me know in advance. That's the beef here! The beef is that you were seen robbing an old lady in the park.
3. noun, slang A strapping, muscular man. I got some of the beefs in facilities to help me move that furniture out of my office.
4. noun, slang An episode of flatulence. His beef had us all scrambling to open a window!
5. verb, slang To fart. Open a window—somebody beefed in here!
6. verb, slang To complain. Of course Marjorie is beefing about how I left dishes out in the kitchen—she's not happy unless everything is perfectly put away.

beef about (someone or something)

To complain or gripe about someone or something, Of course Marjorie is beefing about how I left dishes out in the kitchen—she's not happy unless everything is perfectly put away.
See also: beef

beef to (the) heel

Chubby or fat, especially in the legs. Usually said of women, it comes from the longer phrase "beef to the heel like a Mullingar heifer," referring to cattle bred in Mullingar, a town in County Westmeath, Ireland. Primarily heard in Ireland. I think I need to go on a diet, I've gotten beef to the heel since my pregnancy. I don't know what's wrong with other men, I like a woman who's a bit beef to heel.
See also: beef, heel

beef to (the) heel like a Mullingar heifer

Chubby or fat, especially in the legs. Usually said of women, it refers to cattle bred in Mullingar, a town in County Westmeath, Ireland. Primarily heard in Ireland. I think I need to go on a diet, I've gotten beef to the heel like a Mullingar heifer since my pregnancy. I don't know what's wrong with other men, I like a woman who's beef to heel like a Mullingar heifer.
See also: beef, heel, like

beef to the hoof

Chubby or fat, especially in the legs. Usually said of women, it comes from the longer phrase "beef to the heel like a Mullingar heifer," referring to cattle bred in Mullingar, a town in County Westmeath, Ireland. Primarily heard in Ireland. I think I need to go on a diet, I've gotten beef to the hoof like a Mullingar heifer since my pregnancy. I don't know what's wrong with other men, I like a woman who's beef to hoof.
See also: beef, hoof

beef up

To increase something, often in strength. With all these protestors here, we definitely need to beef up security. My boyfriend has been going to the gym every day for months in hopes of beefing up his frame. We need to beef up our services in order to rival our competitors' more comprehensive offerings.
See also: beef, up

beefcake

A man displayed or photographed for having an attractive, muscular physique, or one who has these qualities in general. I always buy the fire station's charity calendar because I love looking at the beefcakes in their firefighter outfits.

beefed out

1. Portrayed as being exaggeratedly muscular, as of a person (typically male) or an image thereof. The guys in these advertisements are so beefed out that it just looks unrealistic.
2. Strengthened, updated, or improved upon in a robust way. Jenny spends a lot of time and money getting her old Ford Mustang all beefed out.
See also: beef, out

beef-head

A clumsy, cloddish person. Of course he broke the vase—that guy is such a beef-head.

beef-hearts

Farts. I can't believe you let beef-hearts loose in the car. Now we have to smell it all the way home!

bogus beef

An allegation that is untrue. Come on, this is a bogus beef—you have no proof that I did something wrong.
See also: beef, bogus

bum beef

An allegation that is untrue. Come on, this is a bum beef—you have no proof that I did something wrong.
See also: beef, bum

have a beef with (someone or something)

To have an outstanding or unsettled dispute or disagreement with someone or something. Why does she have a beef with me? I'm always nice to her! Dad has a real beef with the phone company because they keep raising their rates.
See also: beef, have

What's (one's) beef (with someone or something)?

Why is one upset (with someone or something)? What is one's problem (with someone or something)? Wow, what's Cheryl's beef today? She's been really snippy with me all day. I'll tell you what my beef with you is—I'm really annoyed that you would leave all these dishes for me to clean up, instead of just doing them yourself! What's your beef with this project? You've had some issue with it from day one.
See also: beef, someone

What's the beef?

What is the problem? "Beef" is slang for conflict, complaint, grudge, feud, etc. He borrowed your sweater and then he returned it. What's the beef?

Where's the beef?

1. What is the problem? This meaning uses "beef" in the sense of a conflict, complaint, grudge, feud, etc. So, he borrowed your sweater and then he returned it. Where's the beef?
2. Where is the most substantive or the important part (of something)? This usage originated with a popular catchphrase introduced in a 1984 commercial for the Wendy's fast food chain in which a woman humorously questioned the purported lack of meat in competitors' hamburgers. The phrase was further popularized that year when US presidential candidate Walter Mondale used it to question the substance of the policy proposals of his primary opponent, Gary Hart. The writing is good, but where's the beef? You need evidence to back up your claims. The program looks good on paper, but how do we know it will really work? Has any research been done? Where's the beef?
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

beef about someone or something

Sl. to complain about someone or something. Stop beefing about Karen. He is always beefing about his working conditions.
See also: beef

beef something up

to add strength or substance to something. Let's beef this music up with a little more on the drums. They beefed up the offer with another thousand dollars.
See also: beef, up

Where's the beef?

Inf. Where is the substance?; Where is the important content? That's really clever and appealing, but where's the beef? Where's the beef? There's no substance in this proposal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

beef up

Strengthen, reinforce, as in Mary wants us to beef up her part in the play. This phrase relies on an older slang sense of beef as "muscles" or "power." [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: beef, up

where's the beef?

1. Also, what's the beef? What is the source of a complaint, as in Where's the beef? No one was hurt in the accident. This usage employs beef in the sense of a "complaint" or "grudge," also appearing in the phrase have no beef with, meaning "have no quarrel with." [Slang; late 1800s]
2. Where is the content or substance, as in That was a very articulate speech, but where's the beef? This usage was originally the slogan for a television commercial for a hamburger chain attacking the poor quality of rival chains. (1984) The phrase was almost immediately transferred to other kinds of substance, especially in politics.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

where's the beef?

used to complain that something is too insubstantial. informal
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

beef up

v.
1. To cause someone or something to become bigger, stronger, or bulkier: You should beef up your travel report with more descriptions of what you saw. The soup tastes good, but we could beef it up by adding some spices.
2. To become bigger, stronger, or bulkier: The actor beefed up over a couple of months so that he could play the part of a boxer.
See also: beef, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beef

1. n. a complaint; a quarrel. I gotta beef against you.
2. n. a criminal charge or complaint. The beef is that you appear to have left the bank Monday with about seventy-five grand that isn’t yours. That’s the beef!
3. n. a large and muscular male. Let’s get one of those beefs in here to help.
4. in. to complain. What’s he beefing about now?
5. in. to break wind; to release intestinal gas audibly. (Usually objectionable.) Willy warned everybody that he was going to beef.
6. n. an act of breaking wind. (Usually objectionable.) All right! Who’s beef was that?
7. in. to crack up and get injured as in a skateboard accident. Chuck beefed and wrecked his elbow.

beef about someone/something

in. to complain about someone or something. He is always beefing about his working conditions.
See also: beef, someone, something

beef something up

tv. to add strength or substance to something. They beefed up the offer with another thousand dollars.
See also: beef, something, up

beefcake

1. n. a display of the male physique. (see also cheesecake.) There was one calendar showing beefcake rather than the usual cheesecake.
2. n. a muscularly handsome male. She’s been going out with a real beefcake.

beef-head

n. an oaf; a meathead. Look you beef-head, lay off!

beef-hearts

n. audible releases of intestinal gas through the anus. (Rhyming slang for farts. Usually objectionable.) No more of these beef-hearts!

bogus beef

and bum beef
n. a false complaint or charge. (see also beef.) The cops took them in on a bogus beef. It’s a bogus beef. I’ll be back on the street in twenty minutes.
See also: beef, bogus

bum beef

verb
See also: beef, bum
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

where's the beef?

Where is the substance to this issue? This expression began life as an advertising slogan for Wendy’s, the third-largest American hamburger chain. In a 1984 television commercial, three elderly women are given a small hamburger on a huge bun, a competitor’s product. They admire the bun, but one of them, a retired manicurist named Clara Peller, asks, “Where’s the beef?” The slogan caught on, and Walter Mondale, seeking the Democratic nomination for president, used it to attack his opponents’ stands and policies. The phrase echoes another, much older slang expression, what’s the beef?, meaning what’s the complaint. The use of the noun beef for gripe or complaint dates from the late 1800s. George V. Higgins used it in Deke Hunter (1976), “I agree with you . . . so what’s the beef?”
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"Aye, aye," said Martin Poyser, listening with an air of much intelligence and edification, "they ne'er ate a bit o' beef i' their lives.
The rafters were soon eased of their burden; venison and beef were passed out to the crew before the door, and a scene of gormandizing commenced, of which few can have an idea, who have not witnessed the gastronomic powers of an Indian, after an interval of fasting.
There were six bottles of milk unopened and one opened, sixty bottles of mineral water and a large stock of syrups, about two thousand cigarettes and upwards of a hundred cigars, nine oranges, two unopened tins of corned beef and one opened, and five large tins California peaches.
He gave the kitten a small second helping and a scrap of beef and then went down with the little creature running after him, tail erect and in high spirits, to look at the remains of the Hohenzollern.
When Bert got to the refreshment shed, he found all the food had vanished except one measured ration of corned beef and three biscuits.
Bert had dropped some of his corned beef, but he found the biscuits in his hand and ate them quietly.
He found them, when he came into sight of them again, seated with their backs against the shed, plates on knee, and a tin of corned beef and a plateful of biscuits between them.
Bert fell back upon imprecations, then he went up to the shed, cursorily examined the possibility of a flank attack, put his gun handy, and set to work, with a convulsive listening pause before each mouthful on the Prince's plate of corned beef. He had finished that up and handed its gleanings to the kitten and he was falling-to on the second plateful, when the plate broke in his hand!
Well, that they wouldn't do, because they would know he had this corned beef; there was enough in this can to last, with moderation, several days.
Like many great generals before him, he found his baggage, that is to say his tin of corned beef, a serious impediment to mobility.
He breakfasted on corned beef and water, and sat for a long time appreciative of the security of his position.
Consumer beef spending during the second quarter of 2000 reached $13.4 billion--an all-time high.