bedtime

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bedtime story

1. A book or story that a child is read or told before going to sleep. The kids always clamor for one more bedtime story—anything to avoid having to go to sleep.
2. A lie or made-up story. I know he's telling me bedtime stories to avoid admitting his mistakes.
See also: bedtime, story

fairy tale

1. noun A lie or fabricated account of something (likened to a clearly fictional fantasy story). I know he's telling me fairy tales to avoid admitting his mistakes.
2. adjective Resembling a fantasy story, especially due to being entirely positive or happy or having a happy ending. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. I really want a fairy-tale wedding, complete with a beautiful gown and a fancy cake. It wasn't some fairy-tale marrage, you know. We had our problems.
See also: fairy, tale

fairy tale

and bedtime story
n. a simplistic and condescending explanation for something; a lie. I don’t want to hear a fairy tale, just the facts, ma’am. I’ve already heard your little bedtime story. You’ll have to do better than that!
See also: fairy, tale

bedtime story

verb
See also: bedtime, story
References in periodicals archive ?
This study supports existing pediatric recommendations that having regular and age-appropriate bedtimes is important for children's health, said lead study author Soomi Lee.
Use a combination of a lot of morning light and activity, followed by a dark room, and a consistent bedtime routine to get him to fall asleep close to that time.
Parents who put babies to sleep in a separate room were less likely to feed infants to help them fall asleep at bedtime or when they awoke during the night, according to the study.
"For parents, this reinforces the importance of establishing a bedtime routine," says epidemiologist Sarah Anderson, lead author of the study.
Research on the bedtime routines of young children suggests that such experiences can provide literacy enhancing benefits.
They found a striking difference: Only 1 in 10 of the children with the earliest bedtimes were obese teens, compared to 16 percent of children with mid-range bedtimes and 23 percent of those who went to bed latest.
In yet another study published this year, early bedtime for preschool-aged children seemed to help prevent obesity in adolescence.
For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 3,300 American teens and found that each extra hour of late bedtime was associated with a more than two-point increase in body mass index (BMI).
And children who had irregular bedtimes or went to bed after 9 p.m.
The data was collected via the UK Millennium Cohort Study, with bedtimes noted at age three, five and seven, and information on behaviour collected from parents and teachers.
To analyse the role of regular bedtimes at childhood, researchers recorded the children's bedtimes and behaviour at different ages, including three, five and seven.
The Question: This study looked at a number of questions related to bedtime schedules and childhood behavioral issues.
Objectives: To determine the demographic and lifestyle predictors of bedtime among secondary school children in Karachi, Pakistan, and to assess what variables of daytime functioning correlate with bedtimes.
These researchers found that adolescents who were depressed had shorter sleep durations and later bedtimes than those who were not depressed.
Another handy tip is that it might be worth taking any distractions, ie favourite toys, out of your child's room at bedtimes so that he gets a clear message that sleep is expected and that playtime is over.