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down to bedrock

Focused on the most important aspects of a particular situation. Often used in the phrase "get down to bedrock." Let's get down to bedrock so that everyone has a good grasp on the project overall before we split up to do our separate parts.
See also: bedrock, down

get down to brass tacks

To focus on the most important aspects of a particular situation. Let's get down to brass tacks so that everyone has a good grasp on the project overall before we split up to do our separate parts. Don't get overwhelmed with this case, just get down to brass tacks.
See also: brass, down, get, tack

get down to brass tacks

Fig. to begin to talk about important things; to get down to business. Let's get down to brass tacks. We've wasted too much time chatting. Don't you think that it's about time to get down to brass tacks?
See also: brass, down, get, tack

get down to brass tacks

Also, get down to bedrock or the nitty gritty or cases . Deal with the essentials; come to the point. For example, Stop delaying and get down to brass tacks, or We really need to get down to bedrock, or He has a way of getting down to the nitty gritty, or Let's get down to cases. The origin of the first phrase, dating from the late 1800s, is disputed. Some believe it alludes to the brass tacks used under fine upholstery, others that it is Cockney rhyming slang for "hard facts," and still others that it alludes to tacks hammered into a sales counter to indicate precise measuring points. The noun bedrock has signified the hard rock underlying alluvial mineral deposits since about 1850 and has been used figuratively to denote "bottom" since the 1860s. The noun nitty-gritty dates from the mid-1900s and alludes to the detailed ("nitty") and possibly unpleasant ("gritty") issue in question. The noun cases apparently alludes to the game of faro, in which the "case card" is the last of a rank of cards remaining in play; this usage dates from about 1900. Also see to the point.
See also: brass, down, get, tack

get down to brass tacks

If people get down to brass tacks, they begin to discuss the basic, most important aspects of a situation. To get down to brass tacks, what I want to know is, do you know anything at all about her mother's side of the family? Note: The usual explanation for this expression is that in Cockney rhyming slang `brass tacks' are facts.
See also: brass, down, get, tack

get (or come) down to brass tacks

start to consider the essential facts or practical details; reach the real matter in hand. informal
1932 T. S. Eliot Sweeney Agonistes That's all the facts when you come to brass tacks: Birth, and copulation, and death.
See also: brass, down, get, tack

get down to brass ˈtacks

(informal) begin to discuss and deal with the really important practical details: Let’s get down to brass tacks — how much will it all cost?
See also: brass, down, get, tack

bedrock

1. n. fundamentals; solid facts. Let’s get down to bedrock and quit wasting time.
2. mod. fundamental. You’ve been avoiding the bedrock issues all your life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 7: Effect of bedrock depth on (a) the required lateral load and (b) the maximum bending moment for a pile head displacement of 38 mm.
Caption: Figure 9: p-y curves of sands at depths of (a) 2.0 m, (b) 2.5 m, (c) 3.0 m, (d) 3.5 m, (e) 4.0 m, and (f) 4.5 m with different bedrock depths.
[gamma]' [phi] [S.sub.u] E Model (kN/[m.sup.3]) ([degrees]) (MPa) (MPa) Pile Elastic 68 n/a n/a 210,000 Sand M-C 9 35.9 0 42 model Bedrock M-C 16 0 27.6 22,300 model Model v Pile Elastic 0.300 Sand M-C 0.300 model Bedrock M-C 0.287 model
We suggest that these 70-450 m wide zones (Figs 3, 4) correspond to fractured Ordovician bedrock with a high fluid content responsible for good electrical conductivity, but the Quaternary sediments may also have contributed (see, e.g., the line ERT1402; Fig.
Because of similar electrical resistivity, the boundary between the Quaternary sediments (RU1) and fractured bedrock (RU4) is indistinguishable.
2017), yet GPR can be effectively used for determining faults, fractures, karst features and overall thickness of the surficial sequence on top of the carbonate bedrock (Dagallier et al.
The uplift of the Aseri's eastern bedrock blocks probably started during the Ediacaran period and continued intermittently later on (Puura & Vaher 1997).
Extensive fracturing of the bedrock and thus lower resistance to the Kongla creek's erosion allowed the forming of the incision up to 20 m deep near the Baltic Klint.
Rattas (2007) analysed the spatial distribution of the bedrock valleys and eskers in northern Estonia and suggested that buried valleys have been important pathways for subglacial meltwater.
Obviously the fractured bedrock described in the ERT images in the Varudi bog and nearby (Figs 3, 4) offered less resistance to the Late Pleistocene glaciers; as the fragmented carbonate beds were outwashed from the bedrock by subglacial waters, glacial and glaciofluvial deposits became their substitutes.
Geophysical methods (GPR and ERT) were used for improving the knowledge about the bedrock topography around Viru-Nigula, NE Estonia.
While ERT was practical in deeper situations, GPR offered detailed results in the near-surface environments, enabling (i) specifying the composition of the Quaternary deposits, (ii) tracing the Ordovician bedrock topography and (iii) recognizing the bedrock dislocations.