bed blocker


Also found in: Medical.

bed blocker

A derogatory term for a person in a hospital, typically an older patient, who is unable to live alone but no longer needs hospital treatment, thus occupying a bed that more needy patients might otherwise use. Primarily heard in UK. The nursing staff is starting to gripe about all the bed blockers.
See also: bed
References in periodicals archive ?
This is why I always smile when I hear youngsters talking about their world, their planet, their future - as if you reach a certain age and suddenly have no interest in anything other than being a drain on the National Health Service and a potential hospital bed blocker.
She added: "I hate the term bed blocker, but that's what I was.
DELAYED discharge patients are taking up 430 beds in Dublin hospitals, forcing the bed blocker issue to crisis point.
Terms such as "old dear" and "bed blocker" must become as unacceptable as sexist or racist expressions, the report's authors said.
But behind every bed blocker is a human being - a mother or father or grandparent; a person who might have fought in world wars; raised kids; probably lived their life with a work ethic that has since well and truly disap-peared from our society.
The "bed blocker" problem common to many hospital systems appears to have been largely alleviated in British Columbia over the decade 1985-95.
Mrs Wiseman will no doubt become a bed blocker in the not-too-distant future, yet if she had a home carer she in the first place would never have been in such a condition to warrant a hospital admission.
"It's a problem that been with us for decades and my experience in hospital in recent years was that there was nearly always a bed blocker in a bay of six beds."
That 'bed blocker' in ward six or 'the stroke' in bay 12 - language that again is being banned in order to improve standards - aren't animals.
His enforced stay in hospital was 10 times longer than the average bed blocker's hospital stay of 90 days.
Figures out yesterday showed "bed blocker" numbers fell from 3021 in September to 2844 in January.
No one becomes a bed blocker voluntarily and I would have hoped the Echo should have a deeper understanding of the situation.
In 2016 the charity set up a successful project to help get people safely home from hospital, who otherwise would have had to stay as bed blockers because their home was so cold.
And it could also tackle the problem of 'bed blockers', whereby people face delays to their hospital discharge because they haven't got a suitable home to return to.