beaten


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Related to beaten: beating, beaten up

along the beaten track

Following that which is commonly used by or known to most people, as of a course, route, or trend. I know people say to be adventurous when traveling, but I like to stay along the beaten track in places I don't know very well. I generally stay along the beaten track with books. I'm not fond of reading those that get too weird or are meant for academics.
See also: beaten, track

on the beaten track

Following that which is commonly used by or known to most people, as of a course, route, or trend. I know people say to be adventurous when traveling, but I like to stay on the beaten track in places I don't know very well. I generally stay on the beaten track with books. I'm not fond of reading those that get too weird or are meant for academics.
See also: beaten, on, track

be off the beaten path

To be little-known or in a remote or lesser-known area, as of a place or business. We'll definitely be able to get a table at that restaurant, it's really off the beaten path. I chose that island as a vacation spot because I knew it was off the beaten path and would give me some much-needed solitude.
See also: beaten, off, path

be off the beaten track

To be little-known or in a remote or lesser-known area, as of a place or business. We'll definitely be able to get a table at that restaurant, it's really off the beaten track. I chose that island as a vacation spot because I knew it was off the beaten track and would give me some much-needed solitude.
See also: beaten, off, track

beat down

1. To exhaust or discourage someone. In this usage, a person's name or pronoun is used between "beat" and "down." The long winters here just beat me down. I miss the warmth of the sun! I think working three jobs has finally beaten Alicia down—all she does these days is come home and sleep.
2. To strike someone or something repeatedly. That bully is always beating down on the smaller kids in our class. Just yesterday, he gave Joey a bloody nose. The rain has been beating down on our roof for hours, and I'm starting to worry that we'll have a leak.
3. To strike something so violently as to cause its collapse. In this usage, a noun can be used between "beat" and "down." I'm coming! Geez, you're going to beat the door down!
4. To strike something repeatedly in order to flatten it. That chicken needs to be thinner before we add the bread crumbs, so beat down on it some more.
See also: beat, down

beat (one) to within an inch of (one's) life

To deliver a very violent and prolonged physical attack. This phrase can be used both literally and hyperbolically. Our neighbor is in the hospital because a burglar beat him to within an inch of his life. I'm worried that the captain of the football team will beat me to within an inch of my life if he finds out that I'm secretly seeing his girlfriend. If you ever scare me like that again, I'll beat you to within an inch of your life, I swear!
See also: beat, inch, life, of, within

off the beaten path

Unusual or unfrequented; in a remote or lesser-known area. We'll definitely be able to get a table at that restaurant, it's really off the beaten path. I chose that island as a vacation spot because I knew it was off the beaten path and would give me some much-needed solitude.
See also: beaten, off, path

off the beaten track

Unusual or unfrequented; in a remote or lesser-known area. We'll definitely be able to get a table at that restaurant, it's really off the beaten track. I chose that island as a vacation spot because I knew it was off the beaten track and would give me some much-needed solitude.
See also: beaten, off, track

beat down (on someone or something)

to fall on someone or something. The rain beat down on us for an hour. The rock slide beat down on the car and totally ruined the body.
See also: beat, down

beat someone down

Fig. to defeat or demoralize someone. The constant bombing finally beat them down. The attackers beat down the defenders.
See also: beat, down

beat something down

 
1. to break something in; to break through something. Don't beat the door down! I'm coming! Please don't beat down the door!
2. to flatten something. Sam beat the veal down to the thickness of a half an inch. First you beat down the meat to a very thin layer.
See also: beat, down

*off the beaten track

 and *off the beaten path
Fig. away from the frequently traveled routes. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; travel ~.) We found a nice little Italian restaurant off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

beat down

1. Force or drive down; defeat or subdue. For example, "And finally to beat down Satan under our feet" ( The Book of Common Prayer, 1552). [c. 1400]
2. Strike violently, as in the The sun kept beating down on us all day long. [Mid-1800s]
3. beat someone down. Make someone lower a price, as in He's always trying to beat us down. Economist Jeremy Bentham used this idiom in 1793: "Thus monopoly will beat down prices." [Slang; late 1700s]
See also: beat, down

off the beaten track

An unusual route or destination, as in We found a great vacation spot, off the beaten track. This term alludes to a well-worn path trodden down by many feet and was first recorded in 1860, although the phrase beaten track was recorded in 1638 in reference to the usual, unoriginal way of doing something.
See also: beaten, off, track

off the beaten track

BRITISH or

off the beaten path

AMERICAN
COMMON If a place is off the beaten track, it is far away from places where most people live or go. The house is sufficiently off the beaten track to deter all but a few tourists. Rents at these malls, which are generally off the beaten path, are lower than at most suburban shopping centers. Note: A track here is a footpath or narrow road.
See also: beaten, off, track

beaten (or pipped) at the post

defeated at the last moment.
The post alluded to here is the marker at the end of a race.
See also: beaten, post

off the beaten track (or path)

1 in or into an isolated place. 2 unusual.
2 1992 Iain Banks The Crow Road ‘Your Uncle Hamish…’ She looked troubled. ‘He's a bit off the beaten track, that boy.’
See also: beaten, off, track

off the ˌbeaten ˈtrack

far away from where people normally live or go: Our house is a bit off the beaten track.
See also: beaten, off, track

beat down

v.
1. To hit something until it falls down: The police beat down the door of the suspect's house. They approached the crumbling wall and beat it down with their bare hands.
2. To defeat or demoralize someone: The constant criticism beat me down, and it was hard for me to try again. The invaders beat down every village they passed through.
3. To fall down steadily and heavily: The rain beat down on the roof.
4. To persuade someone to reduce the price of something: The clerk wanted $40 for the shoes but I beat him down to $30.
See also: beat, down
References in periodicals archive ?
Francis has beaten this season who finished with a winning record.
But the four schools Lakewood has beaten - Dana Hills, Mayfair of Lakewood, Paramount and North Torrance - are a combined 2-10 against other opponents.
If they play even close to the way they played us, there is no chance they will be beaten.
Moisten strips with remaining 1 egg beaten with a dash salt.
Combine pumpkin, remaining 1 egg, beaten, remaining 1/3 cup sugar and pie spice.
Walker, 43, was fatally beaten to death with a two-by-four board and a metal pipe two days after Thanksgiving 1995 in a vacant lot where homeless people gathered behind a McDonald's restaurant in the 800 block of West Avenue I.
He was beaten by Halory Hunter in the Blue Grass; and Real Quiet beat Halory Hunter.
CHOCOLATE MELTING MOMENTS: Stir 1 square (1 ounce) semisweet chocolate, melted and cooled, into beaten margarine.
2--color) Antawn Jamison leads North Carolina, which has beaten Fairfield, Colorado, California and Louisville in the NCAA Tournament.
Mixture must be beaten until it is so smooth that the sugar is hardly noticed.