beat feet

beat feet

To run or flee quickly from a scene or situation; that is, to beat one's feet on the ground rapidly (as in the act of running). We're going to have to beat feet out of here if that alarm goes off!
See also: beat, feet
References in periodicals archive ?
Beat feet to the DJ and request a little Bey just for the girls.
As I moved behind the man and ordered him to interlace his fingers behind his head, he beat feet and the race was on.
We dropped our ordnance on time and on target, and then turned east to beat feet back to the safe line.
The 7-1 shot, ridden by Michael Hills, beat Feet Of Fury by three-quarters of a length.
Finally, we called and told maintenance, who gave us the nod to beat feet.
If we heard a bugle, we would check the wind and then beat feet in the direction of the bull.
Running only on battery now, the sub would beat feet and try to lose the airplane.
Similar busts have been used in prostitution stings in Hollywood since the city adopted the law in 2002, and modeled after a similar measure in Oakland, dubbed Beat Feet.
After you've tired of her contrariness, beat feet back to your main squeeze.
Now, in addition to a catchy cyberspace address, you'll need a Web page design that ensures folks will beat feet to your site and, once there, be able to understand and navigate it.
The distinctive sound of the round chambering in the Spotter sent a clear message to these two Neanderthals: advance and die or beat feet.
45 ammo and beat feet to the gun club to see if it performed as good as it looked.
Bowser beat feet back where he came from and left me screaming like a banshee in front of his neighbor's farmhouse.
Sponsored by Councilman Tom LaBonge, the ordinance is based on a 1997 measure passed in Oakland, where the program is nicknamed Beat Feet.