beat down


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beat down

1. To exhaust or discourage someone. In this usage, a person's name or pronoun is used between "beat" and "down." The long winters here just beat me down. I miss the warmth of the sun! I think working three jobs has finally beaten Alicia down—all she does these days is come home and sleep.
2. To strike someone or something repeatedly. That bully is always beating down on the smaller kids in our class. Just yesterday, he gave Joey a bloody nose. The rain has been beating down on our roof for hours, and I'm starting to worry that we'll have a leak.
3. To strike something so violently as to cause its collapse. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "beat" and "down." I'm coming! Geez, you're going to beat the door down!
4. To strike something repeatedly in order to flatten it. That chicken needs to be thinner before we add the bread crumbs, so beat down on it some more.
See also: beat, down

beat someone down

Fig. to defeat or demoralize someone. The constant bombing finally beat them down. The attackers beat down the defenders.
See also: beat, down

beat something down

 
1. to break something in; to break through something. Don't beat the door down! I'm coming! Please don't beat down the door!
2. to flatten something. Sam beat the veal down to the thickness of a half an inch. First you beat down the meat to a very thin layer.
See also: beat, down

beat down (on someone or something)

to fall on someone or something. The rain beat down on us for an hour. The rock slide beat down on the car and totally ruined the body.
See also: beat, down

beat down

1. Force or drive down; defeat or subdue. For example, "And finally to beat down Satan under our feet" ( The Book of Common Prayer, 1552). [c. 1400]
2. Strike violently, as in the The sun kept beating down on us all day long. [Mid-1800s]
3. beat someone down. Make someone lower a price, as in He's always trying to beat us down. Economist Jeremy Bentham used this idiom in 1793: "Thus monopoly will beat down prices." [Slang; late 1700s]
See also: beat, down

beat down

v.
1. To hit something until it falls down: The police beat down the door of the suspect's house. They approached the crumbling wall and beat it down with their bare hands.
2. To defeat or demoralize someone: The constant criticism beat me down, and it was hard for me to try again. The invaders beat down every village they passed through.
3. To fall down steadily and heavily: The rain beat down on the roof.
4. To persuade someone to reduce the price of something: The clerk wanted $40 for the shoes but I beat him down to $30.
See also: beat, down
References in periodicals archive ?
"We were beat down the middle so it does worry us," Potter said.
China Crisis did a marvellously mellow set that seemed to fit perfectly as the sun beat down on the festival crowd, then came The Real Thing.
I saw these dudes get hit straight in the face with a truck, and dude's just lying on the ground bleeding and getting beat down, but the cops ended up coming.
Only 44 per cent of people try to beat down the price but haggling could save buyers an average pounds 1337 on a new car.
Last year: Beat Down but Donegal ended Ulster hopes.
These are men who have helped to beat down German military ascendancy."
I really don't want to go there next year and get a beat down from my friends' wives who grew up there.
It must have got pretty unpleasant under those heavy garments as the sun beat down and nature took its course,producing copious amounts of sweat.
There's no way Kildare should have done scored 1-6 with reply to beat Down in Newry.
Thousands of people from near and far Waiting for the bass man Steve Roberts to play guitar I sat on the grass and laid on my back As the sun beat down I heard the music of Tramp Attack.
As rain beat down, an owner walking with the aid of a crutch kept her precious pet's feet dry by taking it to the event at the NEC in Birmingham in a pushchair.