beard

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Aaron's beard

Another name for several bushy flowering plants, including the rose of Sharon. The name alludes to the Biblical Aaron and his very long beard. A: "I see these plants everywhere but I can never remember what they're called." B: "Oh, that bush? That's Aaron's beard."
See also: beard

beard

A woman who associates with a gay man so that he can appear to be straight. Not too long ago, gay men had to have beards to ward off suspicion and avoid derailing their acting careers.

beard (one) in (one's) den

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. The phrase is a variation of the Biblical proverb "beard the lion in his den." OK, who is going to beard the boss in his den and tell him that the deal isn't happening?
See also: beard, den

beard the lion

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. Refers to a proverb based on a Bible story from I Samuel, in which a shepherd, David, hunts down a lion that stole a lamb, grasps it by the beard, and kills it. Risks very often don't turn out well, but if you don't face them and beard the lion, you will never achieve the success you truly desire.
See also: beard, lion

beard the lion in his den

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. Refers to a proverb based on a Bible story from I Samuel, in which a shepherd, David, hunts down a lion that stole a lamb, grasps it by the beard, and kills it. A risk very often doesn't turn out well, but if you don't face it and beard the lion in his den, you will never achieve the success you truly desire.
See also: beard, den, lion

make (one's) beard

1. To be in a position of complete control over another person. The image here is of a barber shaving someone's beard (and thus holding a razor to that person's throat). It took some time, but I've made his beard—now, he does anything I say.
2. To deceive someone. Don't make my beard—tell me the truth about what happened!
See also: beard, make

beard the lion in his den

 and beard someone in his den
Prov. to confront someone on his or her own territory. I spent a week trying to reach Mr. Toynbee by phone, but his secretary always told me he was too busy to talk to me. Today I walked straight into his office and bearded the lion in his den. If the landlord doesn't contact us soon, we'll have to beard him in his den.
See also: beard, den, lion

beard the lion

Confront a danger, take a risk, as in I went straight to my boss, bearding the lion. This term was originally a Latin proverb based on a Bible story (I Samuel 17:35) about the shepherd David, who pursued a lion that had stolen a lamb, caught it by its beard, and killed it. By Shakespeare's time it was being used figuratively, as it is today. Sometimes the term is amplified to beard the lion in his den, which may combine the allusion with another Bible story, that of Daniel being shut in a lions' den for the night (Daniel 6:16-24).
See also: beard, lion

beard the lion in his den (or lair)

confront or challenge someone on their own ground.
This phrase developed partly from the idea of being daring enough to take a lion by the beard and partly from the use of beard as a verb to mean ‘face’, i.e. to face a lion in his den.
See also: beard, den, lion

beard the lion, to

To confront a dangerous opponent; to take a risk head-on. The first Book of Samuel (17:35) tells of David, the good shepherd, who pursued a lion that had stolen a lamb and, “when he arose against me, I caught him by his beard, and smote him, and slew him.” The expression often is put, “to beard the lion in his den,” which in effect adds the story of the prophet Daniel, whose enemies had him thrown into a den of lions for the night (Daniel 6:16–24). Daniel survived, saying that God had sent an angel to shut the lions’ mouths. In any event, the term became a Latin proverb, quoted by Horace and Martial and in the Middle Ages by Erasmus, in which a timid hare disdainfully plucked a dead lion’s beard. It began to be used figuratively by the time of Shakespeare, and was a cliché by the mid-nineteenth century.
See also: beard
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, "beardless" Rick still seems to be on set," The Spoiling Dead Fans (https://www.facebook.com/SpoilingDeadFans/posts/382542788567532) wrote .
The presenter of this show always hosts a man who, though beardless, uses religious slogans to promote his herbal remedies.
A genetic aberration-Johnson diagnoses it as Klinefelter's syndrome-left him beardless and deprived him of the pleasures and horrors of puberty.
The beardless Aladeen then finds himself working in a food store cooperative with activist Zoey (Anna Faris) and seeing a different side to New York.
Jahangir as the self-conscious feminized beardless "moon-faced" prince dressed in flamboyant hues of yellow, pink, and orange dismisses the humbly dressed poet and his amorous advances.
"That kept me going alright." But while a lean-looking - and beardless - O'Leary returned early from his summer break to begin work for the World Cup, he returned to find Kidney had picked five scrum-halves among the 43 players selected for his first World Cup training camp.
DRAGONS' DEN star Peter Jones, a beardless Kenny Rogers or a Currys salesman called Wilfred.
Thanks to the representations of his head on coins minted after his death and the countless statues raised in his honour, of which there are several in the exhibition, Alexander became, as Anna Trofimova says, 'an icon frozen in time', eternally youthful with his curly hair, beardless cheeks, and eyes upturned toward the heavens.
Curiously, the official haircut catalog shows only beardless men, even though beards are a mark of Islamic orthodoxy in Iran.
All floral parts are "beardless?' This means that the inner midline of each petal lacks the upright hairs or "beards" characteristic of most European or Asiatic varieties--the species most commonly marketed in plant catalogues.
Among the tales are The King's Son and the Beardless Man, The Fairy Wife Lost and Found, The Old Cow Shepherd and His Son, The King's Daughter and the Manure Collector, The Fairy Virgin in a Pumpkin, and A Pilgrimage to the House of God.
. Plant bearded, beardless and bulbous irises in prepared sites..
(3) In the context of late classical and Hellenistic art, the Sardanapalus-type Dionysus presented an indelible image of truphe (luxury) and contrasted with the youthful, beardless Dionysus more in vogue at that time (Ridgway 2002, 238).
It was certainly not "intergenerational" sex, and often involved a difference of just a few years." Lear mildly argues that "this scene probably...intends their domestic intimacy as erotic." Davidson brings out the many nuances that should astonish us: Achilles is a beardless youth, a Stripling, but with the beard already appearing by his ears; indeed he seems to have raised his cheek-guard to show us his age.