bear/give witness

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bear witness to (something)

To support or prove a claim or idea by one's (or something's) physical presence. The many students on campus these days bear witness to the school's successful rebranding efforts. The beautiful homes and vibrant gardens bear witness to the rebirth of this neighborhood.
See also: bear, witness

give witness to (something)

To support or prove a claim or idea by one's (or something's) physical presence. The many students on campus these days give witness to the school's successful rebranding efforts. The beautiful homes and vibrant gardens give witness to the rebirth of this neighborhood.
See also: give, witness

bear/give ˈwitness (to something)

provide evidence of the truth of something: The huge crowd bore witness to the popularity of this man.
See also: bear, give, witness
References in periodicals archive ?
Winkler chose to remember the physical rape because for her, as for others who bear witness to injustice, forgetting would "dismiss the magnitude and severity of such a heinous crime.
We thought there would be a few mentions on the local news and that would be that, but the national news picked up the story, and suddenly everyone could bear witness to our little girl's exquisite beauty and the pride our parents were feeling in becoming grandparents.
The displacements in the monument to La Boetie that Montaigne had intended to place at the center of Book 1 of the Essais -- the suppression of the Servitude volontaire and the 29 sonnets -- bear witness to the essayist's struggle to work through the doubts he had about his friend's intentions.
So while Enron's shares plummeted from $36 to less than a dollar within three months, workers were forced to hold on to their stock and bear witness to the crash.
All these characters bear witness as the Ku Klux Klan tries to establish a stronghold in a small Vermont town of the 1920s.
Using art as a mnemonic device for a culture's collective memory, these dancers and musicians contributed to the effort to stop the cycle of violence in this world, inviting people to bear witness to beauty in order to remember violence.
At the site of a former church on the corner of Peralta and 7th Streets, Hood set up rows of blue benches like church pews that bear witness to this disappearance.
Even today many public buildings bear witness to the street fighting of the spring of 1945.
Those who made the pilgrimage bear witness to the sacred relationship between the buffalo and Indians, said Joseph Chasing Horse, a traditional Lakota Sioux leader who helped organise and led the event.
The book concludes with the point that even now our collective memory is making "the history of the present," as we remember and forget, bear witness, and choose our actions.
Since so many of his friends died, Dorfman concludes that he was spared for a reason: to bear witness against evil.
Rieff contends that we have a moral obligation to bear witness, but his preoccupation with his feelings, at the expense of factual reporting, obscures what it is we ought to be bearing witness to in Bosnia.
The compliments paid to Cato's verse by contemporary poets bear witness to his preeminence.
The great challenge before us as Presbyterians may not be our institutional future as a church: it may be whether we can faithfully and sensitively bear witness to Jesus Christ in our time.