bear the brunt of

bear the brunt (of something)

To suffer the worst part of an unpleasant or problematic situation. When our system crashed, the call center employees bore the brunt of our customers' anger. Because I came home late, my sister bore the brunt of our mother's frustration about her job.
See also: bear, brunt

bear the brunt of

be the person to suffer the most (as the result of an attack, misfortune, etc.).
The origin of brunt is unknown, and may be onomatopoeic. The sense has evolved from the specific (‘a sharp or heavy blow’) to the more general (‘the shock or violence of an attack’).
See also: bear, brunt, of
References in classic literature ?
The revelation about the money must be made the very next morning; and if he withheld the rest, Dunstan would be sure to come back shortly, and, finding that he must bear the brunt of his father's anger, would tell the whole story out of spite, even though he had nothing to gain by it.
Hiram intended to accompany the officer as a spectator, but he felt no very strong desire to bear the brunt of the battle.
I see not one of them here; they cower as hounds before a lion; it is we, your allies, who bear the brunt of the battle.
Half an hour or more was allowed to elapse between the setting out of the horns or wings of the army before any stir was made by the Greys and their supporting regiment, known as the Buffaloes, which formed its chest, and were destined to bear the brunt of the battle.
Mushahidullah said boosting adaptation in climate-sensitive agriculture, water, livestock, fisheries and forest sectors in the Asia-Pacific region, which is home to two-third of the worlds total extremely poor people, has become indispensable to abate economic inequality as mostly the poor bear the brunt of natural disasters.
MANILA -- Internal Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares on Thursday warned gasoline retailers not to buy smuggled petroleum products because they will bear the brunt of a government investigation.
Summary: Commuters from one county will bear the brunt of the new year rail fare rises, with some season tickets rising more than six per cent.
A survey by insolvency trade body R3 shows that almost half of its members believe the construction sector will bear the brunt of the public sector cutbacks next year.
Too often on a Friday and Saturday night, the police and local A&E departments bear the brunt of some of the worst excesses of binge drinking and alcohol-fuelled crime and disorder.
Mr Birol warned smaller countries at the end of the supply chain will bear the brunt of the threatened world fuel crisis.
LONDON could bear the brunt of the recession while many of England's northern cities weather the storm, a report revealed today.
A SURVEY suggesting older workers will bear the brunt of a sharp rise in unemployment was today branded "extremely worrying" by charities.
While the north of the country is expected to bear the brunt of the Arctic blast, Cardiff and other low-lying areas may also see a dusting of snow.
The very poor people that Oxfam works with will bear the brunt of these disasters.
Expecting car-makers and consumers to bear the brunt of the new regulations will be like flushing the UK motor industry down the loo with one pull of the chain.