bear (one)self

(redirected from bear ourselves)

bear (one)self

To behave in a particular way. I need to bear myself bravely if I want to overcome this fear. I know you guys aren't thrilled about going to Great-Aunt Mildred's, but please try to bear yourselves politely.
See also: bear
References in periodicals archive ?
| 1940: With France collapsing before German forces, the Battle of Britain was about to begin, with Winston Churchill (pictured) saying: "Let us brace ourselves to our duties and so bear ourselves that if the British Commonwealth and Empire lasts a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour'."
1940: With France collapsing before German forces, the Battle of Britain was about to begin, with Winston Churchill saying: "Let us brace ourselves to our duties and so bear ourselves that if the British Commonwealth and Empire lasts a thousand years, men will still say,'This was their finest hour'."
1940: With France collapsing before German forces, the Battle of Britain was about to begin, with Churchill saying: "Let us brace ourselves to our duties and so bear ourselves that if the British Commonwealth and Empire lasts 1,000 years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour'."
Perhaps Mr Christley had Winston Churchill's speech in mind in which he said, "Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say this was their finest hour".
Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth lasts for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour!''
Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'"
Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties and so bear ourselves that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'"
1940: Winston Churchill said: "Let us brace ourselves to our duty and so bear ourselves that if the British Commonwealth and Empire lasts a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour'." This was at the moment that France was collapsing before German forces, at the start of the Battle of Britain.
Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Common -wealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, This was their finest hour."
The Prime Minister then famously added: "Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves, that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour'."
"Let us brace ourselves to do our duty, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Commonwealth and Empire last for a thousand years, men will still say: 'This was their finest hour.'" Those words resonate still today: their finest hour.
'Love' in Paton's sense means active good will to others, the equivalent of that which we bear ourselves, and is the opposite of the wilful ignorance and will to punish that Paton sees as informing the attitudes of South African whites towards black people.
Why ask them to do things that we can't bear ourselves? If we have mercy on them, then Allah will have mercy on us," he added.
brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, "This was their finest hour"'.
All of which brings Smith in a neat circle; he might not actually have said it but the Churchillian message is clear: 'Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that if Worcestershire and New Road last for a thousand years, men will still say 'This was their finest hour'.'