be up to the mark

be up to the mark

To be as good as what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. A: "How's your dinner?" B: "It's up to the mark with this place's usual standard." It's nice to see that Jenny's work is up to the mark again lately.
See also: mark, up

up to the mark

Reaching the level of what was expected, required, or demanded; satisfactory or adequate. Often used in the negative to convey the opposite. I know you've got a lot on your plate, but please make sure your next report is up to the mark—we need to have everything ready for the audit. Unfortunately this submission is just not up to the mark, so we'll have to remove it from consideration.
See also: mark, up

up to the mark

If something is up to the mark, it is of a standard that is good enough and if someone is up to the mark, they are working to a standard that is good enough. Put simply, his work wasn't up to the mark. Ongoing training is required to keep teachers up to the mark. Note: The `mark' in this expression is a hallmark, which is an official symbol put on gold and silver items that reach a particular standard.
See also: mark, up

up to the mark

1 of the required standard. 2 (of a person) as healthy or cheerful as usual.
See also: mark, up

ˌup to the ˈmark

as good as it/they should be: His English and history are very good, but his maths is not really up to the mark.I don’t think we should promote her. She’s just not up to the mark.
See also: mark, up