the order of the day

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the order of the day

Something that is a priority in a certain situation or at a given time. If you're taking the kids to the beach, then sunscreen is the order of the day. While you're in college, studying is the order of the day, not socializing!
See also: of, order

order of the day

something necessary or usual at a certain time. Warm clothes are the order of the day when camping in the winter. Going to bed early was the order of the day when we were young.
See also: of, order

order of the day, the

The prevailing or expected mode, the current agenda, as in Volatility is the order of the day in high-tech stocks, or T-shirts and blue jeans were the order of the day for the picnic. This expression, dating from the late 1600s, originally alluded to the subject of debate in a legislature on a particular day, as well as to specific commands given to troops. Its figurative use dates from the second half of the 1700s.
See also: of, order

the order of the day

COMMON If something is the order of the day, it is what is happening or necessary in a particular situation. Wage cuts were the order of the day owing to the government's economic measures. Informality is the order of the day among all the Princess's household.
See also: of, order

the order of the day

1 the prevailing state of things. 2 something that is required or recommended.
2 2001 Rural Cooperatives Mergers and consolidations have been the order of the day among cooperatives that are faced with the declining number of producers and rising energy-based and other costs.
See also: of, order

the ˌorder of the ˈday

what is normally done, etc. or should be done in a particular situation; the usual attitudes, beliefs, etc. of a particular group of people: Dinner jackets and evening dresses are the order of the day at these parties.
See also: of, order

order of the day, the

The agenda; the most important activity or issue. This term originated in the seventeenth century and was used both in the military, for specific commands given to the troops for the day, and in legislative bodies for the day’s agenda. By the late eighteenth century it was being used figuratively, as by George Washington, quoted as saying (1795), “Peace has been (to borrow a modern phrase) the order of the day.” The poet Howard Fish put it very cynically (The Wrongs of Man, 1819): “The good but pine; the order of the day is—prey on others, or become a prey.”
See also: of, order