be on good, bad, friendly, etc. terms

be on bad terms (with someone)

To be in a state of utter disagreement, dislike, or contempt with someone else. My ex-husband and I wanted to part amicably, but ever since the divorce trial started, we have been on really bad terms. No, I'm on bad terms with Stephanie ever since that argument.
See also: bad, on, term

be on friendly terms with (someone)

To have a pleasant relationship with someone. No, I'm on friendly terms with Stephanie now—we reconciled after that argument. You should always try to be on friendly terms with your boss.
See also: friendly, on, term

be on good terms (with someone)

To have a friendly or pleasant relationship with someone. No, I'm on good terms with Stephanie now—we reconciled after that argument. You should always try to be on good terms with your boss. Anne and Paula had been fighting, but they're on good terms now.
See also: good, on, term

be on good, bad, friendly, etc. ˈterms (with somebody)

have a good, bad, friendly, etc. relationship with somebody: He’s not on very good terms with his wife’s family.I’m on first-name terms with my boss now (= we call each other by our first names).
See also: on, term