be a blessing in disguise

be a blessing in disguise

To result in an unforeseen positive outcome. Running late for work turned out to be a blessing in disguise. I would have been in the middle of that big multi-car pileup had I left the house on time.
See also: blessing, disguise
References in periodicals archive ?
JOE Simpson believes Wasps' failure to qualify for the Heineken Champions Cup could prove to be a blessing in disguise.
I had to opt out of 'Maaya' due to unavoidable circumstances and it turned out to be a blessing in disguise," she added.
FORMER Roscommon All-Star Paul Earley says losing home advantage for the Connacht final replay could be a blessing in disguise.
Mills refuted suggestions the second round exit from the Trophy could be a blessing in disguise.
DAVE BOWMAN reckons the referees' shock strike could turn out to be a blessing in disguise - because it's time foreign and English whistlers were given a chance to rule the roost in Scotland.
"In the end, this defeat could be a blessing in disguise but at the moment, all our thoughts are towards Chelsea."
MASON: my ban could turn out to be a blessing in disguise
Asif, who was banned from international cricket for a year on doping charges, said the break proved to be a blessing in disguise as it helped him overcome his niggling injuries.
Glenn Roeder believes Emre's return to international football tonight has turned out to be a blessing in disguise for Newcastle United, (writes Alan Oliver).
GALWAY boss Conor Hayes says that his side's poor start to the league has turned out to be a blessing in disguise.
Couple say quitting proved to be a blessing in disguise
``That defeat could be a blessing in disguise because we were getting carried away after the Feyenoord and Southampton games,'' he said.
Scotland captain George Salmond said: "At first I wasn't happy about having a blank day at the start of the tournament, but it could be a blessing in disguise.
And only then does Zambia fully comprehend the wisdom of the age-old dictum that even the most painful situation can be a blessing in disguise. The heroine of the last book of the South Carolina Trilogy ultimately becomes one of those resilient children described by Joyce Hansen as "strong enough not to follow the crowd even when the crowd turns out to be members of their own families" (645), and as such she is a convincing channel for values considered by Tare to be essential to the education of middle-grade readers.