batting


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bat a thousand

1. In baseball, to get a hit every time one is at bat (resulting in a batting average of 1.000). The slugger is still batting a thousand after a record eight at-bats.
2. By extension, to be successful in an endeavor or in multiple areas of one's life. I'm really batting a thousand this week—I got an A on my exam, I got the lead in the school play, and I won the poetry contest!
See also: bat, thousand

bat an eye

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eye when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eye.
See also: bat, eye

bat an eyelash

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eyelash when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelash.
See also: bat, eyelash

bat an eyelid

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eyelid when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelid.
See also: bat, eyelid

bat around

1. To push an object around playfully. The cat has been batting around that toy for at least an hour.
2. To strike repeatedly. If I see my neighbor batting around his pets, I will call the police. I was small in high school, so I got batted around a bit, but I eventually learned to stand up for myself.
3. To exchange and contemplate ideas or suggestions. We did bat around other ideas, but that's the slogan we liked the best.
4. To wander aimlessly. I doubt he has a job—he's been batting around out West for a while.
5. In baseball, to reach a team's first batter again in a single inning (because all of the team's batters have already batted in the inning). A: "It's still the top of the third inning?" B: "Yeah, the Cubs have batted around."
See also: around, bat

bat away

1. Literally, to strike a ball away from oneself with a club, bat, or racket. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bat" and "away." I put everything I had into my serves, but my opponent just batted them away as if they were nothing.
2. In baseball, to swing one's bat at will in order to hit the ball. The coach patted the star hitter on the back as she made her way to the plate and told her to bat away.
3. To strike someone or something away from oneself, especially with one's hands. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bat" and "away." I tried to get past the bouncer, but he just batted me away like a fly. It felt like we spent the whole vacation batting away mosquitoes.
4. To avoid, dismiss, or disregard some comment or question. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bat" and "away." I tried to nail down the senator's position on the new tax proposal, but he batted all my questions away. You can't just bat away any bit of criticism leveled at you. You'll never grow as an artist that way!
5. To wink or flutter continuously or at length. Her eyes started batting away as she turned toward the cameras.
See also: away, bat

bat five hundred

To be correct or successful around half of the time. Taken from baseball terminology, referring to the average times a player makes a hit when at bat (i.e. the batting average). One hit for every two at-bats is a .500 batting average. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. That math exam didn't go so well, I only batted five hundred or so. The market is so hit and miss at the moment, you can only really expect to be batting five hundred at best.
See also: bat, five, hundred

bat for both teams

euphemism To be attracted to or have sexual relations with people of the same sex and people of the opposite sex; to be bisexual. How do you feel about dating someone who bats for both teams?
See also: bat, both, team

bat for the other side

1. To play for or support, either secretly or openly, the opposing side in a given contest or debate. Refers to cricket and baseball terminology, meaning to be a batter for the other team during a game. While the senator continues to publicly denounce the proposed tax law, many feel that he is really batting for the other side.
2. euphemism To be attracted to or have sexual relations with people of the same sex; to be homosexual. I asked Simone out on a date, but it turns out that she bats for the other side.
See also: bat, other, side

bat for the other team

1. To play for or support, either secretly or openly, the opposing side in a given contest or debate. Refers to cricket and baseball terminology, meaning to be a batter for the other team during a game. While the senator continues to publicly denounce the proposed tax law, many feel that he is really batting for the other team.
2. euphemism To be attracted to or have sexual relations with people of the same sex; to be homosexual. I asked Simone out on a date, but it turns out that she bats for the other team.
See also: bat, other, team

bat in (one or more runs)

In baseball, to hit the ball and allow for one or more teammates to earn a run. The player batted in over 100 runs that season, the highest in the entire league. If she can bat in just one more run, her team will win the game.
See also: bat, more

bat out

To produce or create something very hastily. A noun or pronoun can be used between "bat" and "out." A: "I can't believe he batted out three papers in one day." B: "I bet he doesn't get very good grades on them though."
See also: bat, out

batting on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: batting, on, sticky, wicket

be (batting) on a losing wicket

To be in a situation in which one is unlikely or unable to win; to be doing something that is likely or certain to fail. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Teachers who try to keep mobile phones out of their classrooms are on a losing wicket these days. The prime minister, knowing his party has been batting on a losing wicket regarding immigration reform, today announced a major U-turn in his position on the matter.
See also: losing, on, wicket

be (batting) on a sticky wicket

To be in the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Primarily heard in UK. I knew I was batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be on quite a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: on, sticky, wicket

be batting a thousand

1. In baseball, to get a hit every time one is at bat (resulting in a batting average of 1.000). The slugger is still batting a thousand after a record eight at-bats.
2. By extension, to be successful in an endeavor or in multiple areas of one's life. I'm really batting a thousand this week—I got an A on my exam, I got the lead in the school play, and I won the poetry contest!
See also: batting, thousand

without (even) batting an eye

Without having or displaying any sort of emotional response, especially to that which would normally elicit such a reaction. When we were traveling, Janet used to eat things like crickets and jellyfish without batting an eye. Be careful—guys like that will kill you without even batting an eye.
See also: batting, eye, without

without (even) batting an eyelash

Without having or displaying any sort of emotional response, especially to that which would normally elicit such a reaction. When we were traveling, Janet used to eat things like crickets and jellyfish without batting an eyelash. Be careful—guys like that will kill you without even batting an eyelash.
See also: batting, eyelash, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bat something around

 
1. Lit. to knock something around with a bat or something similar. Terry spent a little time batting a ball around, then he went home. Let's bat around some balls before we go home.
2. Fig. to discuss something back and forth. Let's bat this around a little bit tomorrow at our meeting. Do you want to bat around this matter a little more?
See also: around, bat

without batting an eye

Lit. Fig. without showing alarm or response; without blinking an eye. I knew I had insulted her, and she turned to me and asked me to leave without batting an eye. Right in the middle of the speechwithout batting an eyethe speaker walked off the stage.
See also: batting, eye, without
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bat around

1. Hit something around, often with a baseball bat or other object, as in We batted the tennis ball around this morning. Originating in baseball, this term came to be applied to more violent action as well, as in Jerry left after being batted around by his father. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
2. Discuss or debate something, as in We batted the various plans around for at least an hour before we came to a decision. This usage transfers batting a ball to a back-and-forth exchange of ideas. [Slang; late 1800s]
3. Drift aimlessly, roam, as in After graduating, they batted around Europe for a year. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: around, bat

without batting an eye

Showing no emotion, acting as though nothing were unusual. For example, Richard ate the snails without batting an eye. A related phrase is not bat an eye, as in He didn't bat an eye when she told him he was being laid off. These expressions, which use bat in the sense of "blink," date from about 1900.
See also: batting, eye, without
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bat a thousand

be enjoying great success. US informal
The metaphor comes from baseball, where someone who was literally ‘batting a thousand’ would have a very high batting average.
2002 DVD Verdict Their first film, Suture , garnered them serious critical acclaim and with The Deep End , they are now batting a thousand.
See also: bat, thousand
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bat a ˈthousand

(American English, informal) be very successful: He’s made another sale? He’s really batting a thousand!
See also: bat, thousand
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bat around

v.
1. To knock something around with or as if with a bat, hand, or similar object: We batted around some baseballs at the park. The cat batted the squeaky toy around the entire afternoon.
2. To discuss something back and forth in order to come to a decision: They batted around ideas all night before they made up their minds. We batted a few names around when thinking about nominees.
See also: around, bat

bat out

v.
To produce something in a hurried or informal manner: The new store owner batted out thank-you notes to his first customers all morning. I don't have time before the big party to bake hundreds of cookies, but I think I can bat a few dozen out.
See also: bat, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

without batting an eye

Betraying no surprise or emotion, remarking nothing unusual. Batting here is an older word for “blinking,” but the term dates only from the turn of the twentieth century. O. Henry used it in Whirligigs (1910): “I’ve stood by you without batting an eye, in earthquakes, fires, and floods.”
See also: batting, eye, without
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
That has all changed however, and this season it's a fine batting wicket.
Steve Rhodes First-class career batting average: 32.74 2003 first-class batting average: 25.75 One-day career batting average: 19.38 2003 one-day batting average: 29 2003 one-day bowling average: N/A Now into his 20th and final year at the club, Rhodes will be 40 in June but remains a safe pair of hands and a reliable batsman.
Mark Harrity First-class career batting average: 5.22 First-class career bowling average: 38.982003 first-class batting average: 10 2003 first-class bowling average: 49.9 One-day career batting average: 6 One-day career bowling average: 26.01 (4.67 runs per over) 2003 one-day batting average: 8.5 2003 one-day bowling average: 23.58 (5.91 runs per over) Moody retains high hopes for the Anglo-Australian, who struggled for rhythm and fitness last year.
Matt Mason First-class career batting average: 14.11 First-class career bowling average: 25.39 2003 first-class batting average: 15.62 2003 first-class bowling average: 21.58 One-day career batting average: 8.72 One-day career bowling average: 24.58 (4.26 runs per over) 2003 one-day batting average: 11.71 2003 one-day bowling average: 24.92 (3.88 runs per over) He may look ungainly, but a la Angus Fraser, he bowls just short of a good length on a tight line and extracts just enough from the pitch to keep the batsmen working hard for every run.
First-class averages: Batting 31.98; bowling 10 wickets at 57.60
First-class averages: Batting 10.45; Bowling 160 wickets at 30.54 GRAHAM WAGG
Statistics seem to prove that aluminum bats improve batting results.
If the need arises for even more sophistication, through competitive pressures to produce even better-performing bats or, perhaps, to produce nonwood bats for the major leagues that perform very much like wooden bats, there's little doubt that the development of more precise dynamic models of batting and finite element analysis will do the trick.
If you happen to be a two-handed, follow-through hitter who can't seem to change, you should at least practice releasing that top hand when hitting off the batting tee.
Following are the good things that have come out of the weight-friendly batting drills:
Summing up: Our drill program with Pro Cut produces quicker hands, strength, a faster swing, functional muscle memory, superior batting mechanics, and a more confident hitter.
Problems may occur when players focus on batting averages rather than quality at-bats.
In the above example, the player wound up with a .333 batting average for the day, but a .750 average in quality at-bats!
Various other batting styles appear to be based on individual idiosyncrasies (Pete Rose, Reggie Jackson, Johnny Bench, et al) rather than any delineated system.
The Combined system of Schmidt stresses "centerfield contact," combining power and high batting average, though Schmidt hit over .300 only once in his career.