batting


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bat an eyelash

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eyelash when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelash.
See also: bat, eyelash

bat an eyelid

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eyelid when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eyelid.
See also: bat, eyelid

bat five hundred

To be correct or successful around half of the time. Taken from baseball terminology, referring to the average times a player makes a hit when at bat (i.e. the batting average). One hit for every two at-bats is a .500 batting average. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. That math exam didn't go so well, I only batted five hundred or so. The market is so hit and miss at the moment, you can only really expect to be batting five hundred at best.
See also: bat, five, hundred

be (batting) on a losing wicket

To be in a situation in which one is unlikely or unable to win; to be doing something that is likely or certain to fail. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Teachers who try to keep mobile phones out of their classrooms are on a losing wicket these days. The prime minister, knowing his party has been batting on a losing wicket regarding immigration reform, today announced a major U-turn in his position on the matter.
See also: losing, on, wicket

batting on a sticky wicket

In the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Refers to the pitch, called a "wicket," used in the game of cricket and the difficulty of playing on one after it has been wetted with rain. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I found myself batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be batting on a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: batting, on, sticky, wicket

bat a thousand

1. In baseball, to get a hit every time one is at bat (resulting in a batting average of 1.000). The slugger is still batting a thousand after a record eight at-bats.
2. By extension, to be successful in an endeavor or in multiple areas of one's life. I'm really batting a thousand this week—I got an A on my exam, I got the lead in the school play, and I won the poetry contest!
See also: bat, thousand

bat an eye

To display a subtle emotional reaction, such as consternation, annoyance, sadness, joy, etc. Generally used in the negative to denote that the person in question did not display even a hint of an emotional response. Mary didn't even bat an eye when I told her I was moving out. That guy is dangerous. I heard he killed a man without batting an eye.
See also: bat, eye

bat around

1. To push an object around playfully. The cat has been batting around that toy for at least an hour.
2. To strike repeatedly. If I see my neighbor batting around his pets, I will call the police. I was small in high school, so I got batted around a bit, but I eventually learned to stand up for myself.
3. To exchange and contemplate ideas or suggestions. We did bat around other ideas, but that's the slogan we liked the best.
4. To wander aimlessly. I doubt he has a job—he's been batting around out West for a while.
5. In baseball, to reach a team's first batter again in a single inning (because all of the team's batters have already batted in the inning). A: "It's still the top of the third inning?" B: "Yeah, the Cubs have batted around."
See also: around, bat

be (batting) on a sticky wicket

To be in the midst of or dealing with a particularly awkward or difficult situation or circumstance. Primarily heard in UK. I knew I was batting on a sticky wicket when the boss saw me kissing his daughter at the cinema. I'll be on quite a sticky wicket if I arrive at the train station and don't have enough money for the tickets!
See also: on, sticky, wicket

be batting a thousand

1. In baseball, to get a hit every time one is at bat (resulting in a batting average of 1.000). The slugger is still batting a thousand after a record eight at-bats.
2. By extension, to be successful in an endeavor or in multiple areas of one's life. I'm really batting a thousand this week—I got an A on my exam, I got the lead in the school play, and I won the poetry contest!
See also: batting, thousand

bat something around

 
1. Lit. to knock something around with a bat or something similar. Terry spent a little time batting a ball around, then he went home. Let's bat around some balls before we go home.
2. Fig. to discuss something back and forth. Let's bat this around a little bit tomorrow at our meeting. Do you want to bat around this matter a little more?
See also: around, bat

without batting an eye

Lit. Fig. without showing alarm or response; without blinking an eye. I knew I had insulted her, and she turned to me and asked me to leave without batting an eye. Right in the middle of the speechwithout batting an eyethe speaker walked off the stage.
See also: batting, eye, without

bat around

1. Hit something around, often with a baseball bat or other object, as in We batted the tennis ball around this morning. Originating in baseball, this term came to be applied to more violent action as well, as in Jerry left after being batted around by his father. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
2. Discuss or debate something, as in We batted the various plans around for at least an hour before we came to a decision. This usage transfers batting a ball to a back-and-forth exchange of ideas. [Slang; late 1800s]
3. Drift aimlessly, roam, as in After graduating, they batted around Europe for a year. [Slang; c. 1900]
See also: around, bat

without batting an eye

Showing no emotion, acting as though nothing were unusual. For example, Richard ate the snails without batting an eye. A related phrase is not bat an eye, as in He didn't bat an eye when she told him he was being laid off. These expressions, which use bat in the sense of "blink," date from about 1900.
See also: batting, eye, without

bat a thousand

be enjoying great success. US informal
The metaphor comes from baseball, where someone who was literally ‘batting a thousand’ would have a very high batting average.
2002 DVD Verdict Their first film, Suture , garnered them serious critical acclaim and with The Deep End , they are now batting a thousand.
See also: bat, thousand

bat a ˈthousand

(American English, informal) be very successful: He’s made another sale? He’s really batting a thousand!
See also: bat, thousand

bat around

v.
1. To knock something around with or as if with a bat, hand, or similar object: We batted around some baseballs at the park. The cat batted the squeaky toy around the entire afternoon.
2. To discuss something back and forth in order to come to a decision: They batted around ideas all night before they made up their minds. We batted a few names around when thinking about nominees.
See also: around, bat
References in periodicals archive ?
A terrible Test pitch in recent years but the most startling fact about Edgbaston in county action is the record of sides batting second in one-day games.
That has all changed however, and this season it's a fine batting wicket.
If the need arises for even more sophistication, through competitive pressures to produce even better-performing bats or, perhaps, to produce nonwood bats for the major leagues that perform very much like wooden bats, there's little doubt that the development of more precise dynamic models of batting and finite element analysis will do the trick.
If you happen to be a two-handed, follow-through hitter who can't seem to change, you should at least practice releasing that top hand when hitting off the batting tee.
Hail, Cesar: After an abysmal first month of the season batting from the left side, which followed an awful 2002 in which Cesar Izturis batted .
His story: A 12th-round draft selection out of Texas Christian University in 2001, Macha (pronounced Ma-ha) spent all of last season in Lancaster, where he played four positions (shortstop, second base, third base and left field) and emerged as a key role player in the second half, batting .
With the left-handed Green and McGriff being split by right-handed batting Brian Jordan and followed by Adrian Beltre, it could create matchup problems for opposing managers who might have to choose between Green or McGriff facing a left-handed reliever in the late innings.
2) With Brian Jordan, left, and Fred McGriff in the batting order, the Dodgers have more options.
Izturis) thought he looked the same left-handed as he does right-handed, and he doesn't,'' Dodgers batting coach Jack Clark said.
To combat his struggles against right-handers, Clark suggested Izturis change his grip to a Bill Madlock-style, keeping his hands slightly separated, when batting left-handed.
Foreman, the subject of a recent Baseball Weekly feature, was batting .
I know I'm not as quick as I was (with the bat),'' said Sheffield, who is batting .
However, Beltre's taking live batting practice and fielding grounders, which gives the club hope.
469 batting average, first in home runs with 16 and second in RBI with 48.
Closser struggled at Single-A South Bend last year, batting .