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an early bath

A premature end to something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Take an early bath, Edwards! I don't tolerate illegal hits on my playing field!
See also: bath, early

don't throw the baby out with the bathwater

Don't discard something valuable or important while disposing of something worthless. Why are we scrapping the entire project? Come on, don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

throw out the baby with the bathwater

To discard something valuable or important while disposing of something considered worthless, especially an outdated idea or form of behavior. The phrase is often used in the negative as a warning against such thoughtless behavior. Why are we scrapping the entire project? Come on, don't throw out the baby with the bathwater. The main reforms of the movement were desperately needed, but I'm afraid we threw out the baby with the bathwater in many cases.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

throw the baby out with the bathwater

To discard something valuable or important while disposing of something considered worthless, especially an outdated idea or form of behavior. The phrase is often used in the negative as a warning against such thoughtless behavior. Why are we scrapping the entire project? Come on, don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. The main reforms of the movement were desperately needed, but I'm afraid we threw the baby out with the bathwater in many cases.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

take a bath

1. Literally, to bathe in the bathtub. A: "Remember that the kids need to take a bath tonight." B: "Yep, I'm filling up the tub now."
2. To bathe, not necessarily in the bathtub. I got really dirty, so I'll need to take a bath before we go. I'll just hop in the shower when I get home.
3. To experience or accumulate a large financial loss on a transaction or investment. Often followed by "on (something)." Millions of the company's investors took a bath when the CEO resigned and its stock began plummeting. A lot of stores started stocking huge numbers of the gimmicky fad toy, but now they're taking a bath on it as public interest evaporates.
See also: bath, take

take a bath on (something)

To experience or accumulate a large financial loss on a transaction or investment. A lot of stores started stocking huge numbers of the gimmicky fad toy, but now they're taking a bath on it as public interest evaporates. Millions of the company's shareholders took a bath on their investment when the CEO resigned and its stock began plummeting.
See also: bath, on, take

take an early bath

1. To be sent to the sidelines or the locker room in a game by one's coach. Primarily heard in UK. The keeper had already allowed three goals before he took an early bath in the first half of the game.
2. To fail or experience an insurmountable setback before or very early on in a competition. Primarily heard in UK. The rising political star has taken an early bath ahead of the elections after making several racist and misogynistic claims to a local newspaper. I ended up taking an early bath when my carburetor blew out shortly after the race began.
See also: bath, early, take

Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater.

Prov. Do not discard something valuable in your eagerness to get rid of some useless thing associated with it. Jill: As long as I'm selling all the books Grandpa had, I might s well sell the bookcases, too. Jane: Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. You can use the bookcases for something else.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

take a bath (on something)

Sl. to accumulate large losses on a business transaction or an investment. (Alludes to getting soaked, a slang expression meaning "being heavily charged for something.") Sally took a bath on that stock that she bought. Its price went down to nothing. I'm afraid that I will take a bath on any investment I make.
See also: bath, take

throw the baby out with the bath(water)

Fig. to dispose of the good while eagerly trying to get rid of the bad. (Fig. on the image of carelessly emptying a tub of both the water inside as well as the baby that was being washed.) In her haste to talk down a project that had only a few disagreeable points, she has thrown the baby out with the bathwater. Hasty action on this major spending bill will result in throwing out the baby with the bath.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw

take a bath

Experience serious financial loss, as in The company took a bath investing in that new product. This idiom, which originated in gambling, transfers washing oneself in a bathtub to being "cleaned out" financially. [Slang; first half of 1900s]
See also: bath, take

throw out the baby with the bath water

Discard something valuable along with something not wanted. For example, I know you don't approve of that one item in the bill but we shouldn't throw out the baby with the bath water by voting the bill down . This expression, with its vivid image of a baby being tossed out with a stream of dirty water, is probably translated from a German proverb, Das Kind mit dem Bade ausschütten ("Pour the baby out with the bath"). It was first recorded in English in 1853 by Thomas Carlyle, who translated many works from German.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water

throw the baby out with the bath water

If someone throws the baby out with the bath water, they reject an idea completely, even though some parts of it are good. Even if we don't necessarily like the whole scheme, we're not going to throw the baby out with the bath water. In rejecting traditional values, they have thrown the baby out with the bathwater.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water

an early bath

BRITISH
If a football or rugby player has an early bath, they are sent off the pitch before the end of the game, because they have broken the rules. When it is a midfield player who takes an early bath, the impact is almost zero. Ref Graeme Allison had no hesitation in sending the 16-year-old for an early bath. Note: In football and other sports, players who are sent off cannot return to the field and so can take a bath before the game is finished.
See also: bath, early

take a bath

JOURNALISM
If a person or a company takes a bath, they lose a lot of money on an investment. It is America's third-biggest bank failure and its stockholders have taken a bath. Investors in the company took a 35 million dollar bath on the company, which entered bankruptcy proceedings 18 months ago.
See also: bath, take

throw the baby out with the bathwater

discard something valuable along with other things that are inessential or undesirable.
This phrase is based on a German saying recorded from the early 16th century but not introduced into English until the mid 19th century, by Thomas Carlyle . He identified it as German and gave it in the form, ‘You must empty out the bathing-tub, but not the baby along with it.’
1998 New Scientist It is easy to throw out the baby with the bathwater when it comes to UFO books—there are some seriously bad titles out there.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

take a bath

suffer a heavy financial loss. informal
1997 Bookseller When the yen drops in value, as it is doing right now, we take a bath. There is no way to change the prices fast enough.
See also: bath, take

take an early bath

1 be sent off in a game of football or other sport. 2 fail early on in a race or contest. informal
The allusion is to the bath or shower taken by players at the end of a match.
2 1992 Bowlers' World Defending champion Dave Phillips took an early bath losing all his three opening qualifying games.
See also: bath, early, take

throw the ˌbaby out with the ˈbathwater

(informal) lose something that you want at the same time as you are trying to get rid of something that you do not want: It’s stupid to say that the old system of management was all bad; there were some good things about it. The baby was thrown out with the bathwater.
See also: baby, bathwater, out, throw

take a ˈbath

(American English, informal, business) lose a lot of money, for example on a business agreement or an investment: Big investors sold their shares before the price crashed, but small investors took a bath. OPPOSITE: make, etc. a mint (of money)
See also: bath, take

take a bath (on something)

tv. to have large financial losses on an investment. The broker warned me that I might take a bath if I bought this stuff.
See also: bath, on, something, take

take a bath

verb
See also: bath, take

tonsil bath

n. liquor; a drink of liquor. I could use a little tonsil bath about now.
See also: bath, tonsil

take a bath

Informal
To experience serious financial loss: "Small investors who latched on to hot new issues took a bath in Wall Street" (Paul A. Samuelson).
See also: bath, take

throw the baby out with the bath water

Slang
To discard something valuable along with something not desired, usually unintentionally.
See also: baby, bath, out, throw, water
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of whether you have traditional or contemporary home, our new baths will make a luxurious statement in your bathroom.
The brand's wonderful KnotWrap scarves can be used to wrap bath bombs, body lotion, soaps and bubble barsanything you fancy.
Ramsden Street Baths were built in 1879 and closed in 1972.
Mrs Brown has been working on Bath Relaxer(r) for the last 12 months ahead of its launch this week.
The architectural and spatial features of the Turkish Baths will be discussed and their importance in the socio-cultural life will be mentioned.
Not being a water lover, my other half skipped the baths and headed instead for Number 1 Royal Crescent.
Valencia Shower Baths are currently available at the fantastic sale price of Au269.
New events, enticing exhibitions and an enduring appeal of history, architecture and spa culture means Bath should be on anyone's list of must-see places to visit 1.
The Romans began construction of the baths around 43AD and built up the complex of Aquae Sulis over the next 300 years.
I well recall having my standing leg kicked from under me in Westminster Road baths and, in the subsequent thrashing about, realising that I could keep afloat.
The baths became during the Islamic Era an important destination to exercise the social rituals and a witness to intimate social relations.
The former baths man at Gilkes Street slipper baths.
1789: Liverpool's Jewish community opens ritual baths in Brownlow Hill.
In this study, after giving general information about Roman baths and their heating systems, some experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies are introduced.
The baths in super sentos, with few exceptions, do not use natural hot springs most of the time.