barred


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bar from (something or some place)

To prohibit someone from a certain place or thing. My rude comments got me barred from that website. My friends and I were barred from that restaurant after we got into a fight there. I bar you from every coming in here again.
See also: bar

bar out

obsolete To lock a teacher out of a school or classroom, as by barring the door shut. This was once a Christmas tradition in the 17th century, with students often demanding gifts in return for letting the teacher or schoolmaster back inside. The schoolmaster had become so used to being barred out on Christmas morning that he began preparing a basket of small gifts and treats for his students in anticipation of their antics. Two of the boys in our grammar school were eager to revive the old tradition of barring out, but no one else was foolish enough to go along with it.
See also: bar, out

no holds barred

Having no restraints or restrictions. An allusion to wrestling, in which certain holds are disallowed. Usually used before a noun, in which case it is hyphenated. Her no-holds-barred interview of the president has been making waves across the nation. The play is a no-holds-barred indictment of religion. I could hear them arguing no holds barred.
See also: barred, hold, no
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

no holds barred

Fig. with no restraints. (Alludes to a wrestling match in which all holds are legal.) I intend to argue it out with Mary, no holds barred. When Ann negotiates a contract, she goes in with no holds barred and comes out with a good contract.
See also: barred, hold, no
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

no holds barred

Without any restrictions, as in Telephone companies are entering the market for Internet users with no holds barred. This expression comes from wrestling, where certain holds are illegal, or barred, and has been used figuratively since about 1940.
See also: barred, hold, no
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no-holds-barred

COMMON You use no-holds-barred to describe something which is done in a forceful or extreme way, without any limits. Jones had a no-holds-barred approach to the game of football. Note: This expression refers to a wrestling match in which many of the usual rules do not apply, and so competitors can hold their opponent in any way they like.
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

no holds barred

no rules or restrictions apply in a particular conflict or dispute.
No holds barred was originally a phrase used only in wrestling, where it indicated that there were no restrictions on the kinds of holds used.
See also: barred, hold, no
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(with) ˌno ˌholds ˈbarred

(of fighting, competition, etc.) with no or very few rules or restrictions: This started off as a very clean election campaign, but now it’s no holds barred.a no-holds-barred row over the latest political scandal
In wrestling, no holds barred means that there are no rules about which ways of holding your opponent are allowed and which are not.
See also: barred, hold, no
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

no holds barred

mod. without restriction. (There is no affirmative version of this.) I want you to get that contract. Do anything—no holds barred.
See also: barred, hold, no
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

no holds barred

Without limits, regulations, or restraints.
See also: barred, hold, no
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no holds barred

Without any restrictions. The term comes from wrestling, where certain holds are illegal. Its figurative use dates from the mid-1900s. For example, “No holds were barred, so to speak, for the Prince’s unorthodox education” (Times, Nov. 28, 1958).
See also: barred, hold, no
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kelly Weisberg, "Barred from the Bar: Women and Legal Education in the United States, 1870-1890," Journal of Legal Education 28 (1977): 488.
For spirals with a bar that wasn't very prominent, de Vaucouleurs introduced an intermediate type (SAB) between the "ordinary" spirals (SA) and the strongly barred systems (SB).
In addition, many barred spirals have not only one large-scale primary bar but also a small secondary one nested in their cores.
Surface photometry with CCDs has shown, however, that barred structures are, in general, more boxy than elliptical.
Yet another revelation is that barred galaxies often host stellar and gaseous rings, particularly nuclear rings, typically 3,000 light-years across, that closely encircle their cores.
Both formation processes seem necessary to explain some differences observed in the bar properties of "early-type" (SBa, SBb) and "late-type" (SBc, SBd) barred spirals.