bargain for (something)

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bargain for (something)

To prepare for or expect something. This report has been more than I bargained for—I've been working on it for hours. They bargained for an easy flight but faced a lot of turbulence instead.
See also: bargain

bargain for something

 and bargain on something
to plan for something; to expect something. We knew the project would be difficult, but we didn't bargain for this kind of trouble. I bargained on an easier time of it than this.
See also: bargain

bargain for

1. Also, bargain over. Negotiate about something, usually a price. For example, In open-air markets it is standard practice to bargain for the best price. [Late 1300s]
2. Also, bargain on. Expect, be prepared for, as in In planning the picnic, we hadn't bargained for bad weather, or I hadn't bargained on John's coming along. [c. 1800] For a synonym, see count on.
See also: bargain

bargain for

v.
1. To negotiate with someone about obtaining something: I had to bargain for the car with the sales person, who finally lowered the price by $250.
2. To expect or be prepared for something: She got more than she had bargained for when the little puppy she bought grew into a very big dog with a large appetite.
See also: bargain
References in periodicals archive ?
The development of a scheme of collective bargaining for self-employed workers, where an assessment is made at the outset of the suitability of such workers for bargaining, could have advantages.
The third approach to providing access to collective bargaining for self-employed workers is to enact industry or occupation specific bargaining regimes for a class of workers in an industry or occupation.
(117) For the purposes of bargaining for an agreement, the statute permits the use of pressure tactics akin to strike action, and contains provisions dealing with unfair labour practices.
(149) The experiences in Australia and Canada outlined in this article show three predominant approaches to providing access to collective bargaining for self-employed workers:
Most of the schemes discussed, with the notable exception of the Status of the Artist Act, were not designed primarily to facilitate access to collective bargaining for self-employed workers but rather came about due to some other reason.
The primary issue in the design of any scheme of collective bargaining for self-employed workers is to determine who will be covered by the scheme and to identify the particular characteristics of the workers and their working arrangements.
There are two potential approaches to identifying such workers that emerge from the models considered in this article--sector specific bargaining for minimum conditions, and identification of groups of workers appropriate for bargaining.
In developing a collective bargaining model for these workers, the focus has been on establishing structures that facilitate bargaining for fair pay and conditions for the majority of workers in the sector, while allowing outliers to negotiate better deals for themselves above the conditions set within collective agreements.
However, if this approach was not preferred, an alternative would be a model involving an assessment of the suitability of collective bargaining for workers in a particular industry or occupation, or for a specific group of workers who wish to engage in collective bargaining.
Once issues of coverage are determined, the discussion in this article has shown that there are a range of other factors which need to be carefully considered in the regulatory design for any model of collective bargaining for self-employed workers.
A final issue raised by the discussion relates to access to collective bargaining for workers whose terms and conditions of engagement are substantially determined by a party who may not be in a direct contractual relationship with the worker concerned.