bare (one's) teeth

(redirected from bare its teeth)
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bare (one's) teeth

To display an angry, violent, and/or threatening reaction to or against something or someone, as does a dog or wolf when threatened. I will bare my teeth to anyone who tries to take away my land. We seemed to be getting along just fine, but she suddenly bared her teeth when I brought up religion.
See also: bare, teeth

bare one's teeth

Also, show one's teeth. Indicate hostility and readiness to fight, as in His refusal to accept my offer made it clear I'd have to bare my teeth, or In this instance, calling in a lawyer is showing one's teeth. This figurative term transfers the snarl of a dog to human anger. It first was recorded as show one's teeth in 1615.
See also: bare, teeth

bare your ˈteeth

show your teeth in a fierce and threatening way: The dog bared its teeth and growled.
See also: bare, teeth
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence tending to prove that a dog has vicious propensities, for purposes of an owner's liability, include a prior attack, the dog's tendency to growl, snap, or bare its teeth, the manner in which the dog was restrained, and a proclivity to act in a way that puts others at risk of harm.
It has begun to bare its teeth and it is not a pretty sight
It might be easier if it was a decent social satire, but it doesn't bare its teeth enough.
We did not have to wait a long time after "Energy Day" for the Commission to bare its teeth. The September 21 meetings between regulatory and competition authorities and the Commission services resulted in a guideline being formulated with a view to improving laws on liberalisation.
But I would expect this course to bare its teeth soon."
Dr Adrian Friday, of the Museum of Zoology, said: 'If you confront a baboon, it will bare its teeth. It appears female baboons find that important.
Meanwhile, Woodward last night laid down the law to a Lions pack that must bare its teeth in pursuit of Test series salvation.
DEFENDING Open champion Paul Lawrie reckons the Old Course at St Andrews could bare its teeth and become the venue to tame Tiger Woods.
The ground rules have been set for a show which can be couthy and charming, but can bare its teeth enough to avoid being dull.