baptism

(redirected from baptismal)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to baptismal: baptismal font

baptism by fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism by fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism by fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire

baptism of fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism of fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism of fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

Fig. a first experience of something, usually something difficult or unpleasant. My son's just had his first visit to the dentist. He stood up to this baptism of fire very well. Mary's had her baptism of fire as a teacher. She was assigned to the worst class in the school.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

A severe ordeal or test, especially an initial one, as in This audition would be Robert's baptism of fire. This term transfers the original religious rite of baptism, whereby holiness is imparted, to various kinds of ordeal. At first it signified the death of martyrs at the stake, and in 19th-century France it was used for a soldier's first experience of combat. Currently it is used more loosely for any difficult first encounter.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

COMMON If your first experience of a new situation is a baptism of fire, it is very difficult or unpleasant. They have given themselves a baptism of fire by playing the four best teams in the world. Having never managed a team before, I was suddenly managing thirty people. It was a baptism of fire. Note: This expression originally referred to the deaths of martyrs (= people who die because of their beliefs) by burning. It was later used by the French Emperors Napoleon Bonaparte and Napoleon III to refer to someone's first experience of battle.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

a difficult introduction to a new job or activity.
A baptism of fire was originally a soldier's initiation into battle.
1998 Times Opposition spokesmen do not normally face a baptism of fire, but the Bank of England's unexpected decision…provided the Shadow Chancellor with an opportunity to make an early mark.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a ˌbaptism of ˈfire

an unpleasant or a frightening first experience of something: Her first day in the job was a real baptism of fire because she had to deal with a very difficult case immediately.
See also: baptism, fire, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Description of the baptismal services and laying on of hands varied widely.
But by drinking anew of our baptismal grace, we are empowered to follow Jesus Christ even at the cost of our own life.
The Church had a practical spiritual reason for limiting the number of baptismal kin.
Attention placed on baptismal theology, however, was replaced by efforts to defend the practice of believer's baptism, and as a result, the theology of baptism was quickly forgotten.
Apprentice Gavin Faulkner was banned for two days (September 3 and 4) after he failed to weigh-in on fourth-placed Baptismal Rock in the contest landed by Bold Frontier.
Macbeth's wish to tear up "that Great Bond / Which keeps me pale" is tied to baptism, signaled by a white ("pale") baptismal gown.
This provides an ecumenical framework for assessing differing Christian practices and theological interpretations of confirmation and baptismal renewal.
Using tax, subscription, and address lists as well as data from kosher butchers, genealogical information, baptismal records, religious and philosophical texts, and government decrees, Lowenstein has written a collective biography of an important community facing what he terms a crisis.
Handmade boxes of rat bait interrupt this feeling of woozy serenity, this baptismal splashing.
Bernadette, the Chapel where she received her First Holy Communion and the Parish Church with the baptismal font where she was baptized.
We are, on the contrary, vocation-rich, with scores of lay ministers answering their baptismal call to teach, sanctify, and serve God's people.
The report will "harvest the theological fruits" of 40 years of agreements of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, "taking the thinking and turning it into mission" said Bishop Edwin Gulick of Kentucky, citing prayer services where Roman Catholics and Anglicans renew their baptismal VOWS.
The volume begins with a look back at Luther's work (and the Church Orders) on Baptism, followed by an analytical description of the baptismal work of the Inter-Lutheran Commission on Worship (ILCW) and how they reflect or differ from Luther's work.
Since the 11th century, almost all newly elected popes have given up their baptismal names in favor of a new name.