baptism


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baptism by fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism by fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism by fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, by, fire

baptism of fire

1. The first time a soldier enters combat. Taken from a phrase that originates from the Bible, in Matthew 3:11. As they marched onto the battlefield, you could see all of the uniformed boys become men as they experienced baptism of fire.
2. A difficult ordeal that one has to undergo through immersion and without preparation. One week into her new job, Mary felt like she was undergoing a baptism of fire when she was suddenly put in charge of the company's largest account.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

Fig. a first experience of something, usually something difficult or unpleasant. My son's just had his first visit to the dentist. He stood up to this baptism of fire very well. Mary's had her baptism of fire as a teacher. She was assigned to the worst class in the school.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

A severe ordeal or test, especially an initial one, as in This audition would be Robert's baptism of fire. This term transfers the original religious rite of baptism, whereby holiness is imparted, to various kinds of ordeal. At first it signified the death of martyrs at the stake, and in 19th-century France it was used for a soldier's first experience of combat. Currently it is used more loosely for any difficult first encounter.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

COMMON If your first experience of a new situation is a baptism of fire, it is very difficult or unpleasant. They have given themselves a baptism of fire by playing the four best teams in the world. Having never managed a team before, I was suddenly managing thirty people. It was a baptism of fire. Note: This expression originally referred to the deaths of martyrs (= people who die because of their beliefs) by burning. It was later used by the French Emperors Napoleon Bonaparte and Napoleon III to refer to someone's first experience of battle.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a baptism of fire

a difficult introduction to a new job or activity.
A baptism of fire was originally a soldier's initiation into battle.
1998 Times Opposition spokesmen do not normally face a baptism of fire, but the Bank of England's unexpected decision…provided the Shadow Chancellor with an opportunity to make an early mark.
See also: baptism, fire, of

a ˌbaptism of ˈfire

an unpleasant or a frightening first experience of something: Her first day in the job was a real baptism of fire because she had to deal with a very difficult case immediately.
See also: baptism, fire, of

baptism of fire

One’s first encounter with a severe ordeal or painful experience. The term is believed to come from the death of martyrs, especially those who were burned at the stake. In the nineteenth century it acquired a more specific meaning in France, that is, the experience of a soldier’s first battle. It was so used by Napoleon III in a letter describing his son’s initiation into combat. Later it was extended to mean any initial encounter with a difficult situation—as, for example, one’s first job interview.
See also: baptism, fire, of
References in periodicals archive ?
While Jesus had nothing to repent for, in humility he presented himself to John for baptism, a public display to God's commands and fulfilment of His laws.
Church officials said, "Jesus' baptism celebrates His second manifestation as the Son of God (Epiphany), as well as the manifestation of the Holy Trinity: the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit (Theophany).
They could better understand how his baptism was more than a moment; it began his way of life and death.
I told him I have no problem with someone having a bottle of water from the Jordan River or even if someone wants to use it for a baptism. The problem I saw is you can't make baptism more of baptism by using water from the Jordan.
Immediately after her baptism, Markle was also confirmed.
Part Two provides an introduction to the subject of experiencing the baptism of the Spirit, receiving the baptism, and evidences of the baptism.
Asked why baptism was not a priority for these families, Recio said: 'For them, survival came first, they needed to have food on the table every day.'
The same can be said, I believe, about the postliberal baptismal theologies I outline here: although both Hauerwas and Bauerschmidt attempt to describe how baptism opens Christians to vulnerable interaction with "strangers," their conviction that baptismal practice unambiguously distinguishes Christians from "the world" forecloses vulnerability.
One such complex sacrament is the ritual of baptism, through which Copts believe they are born again by being immersed in water three times in the name of the Holy Trinity: the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.
In his contribution, he asks the believers' baptism churches some important questions that might lead forward in the question of mutual recognition of baptism with churches that practice infant baptism.
The church--by which I mean both East and West, Reformed and not--has held or emphasized various understandings over the centuries about both what is accomplished in baptism and by Jesus' death and resurrection.
oday, the community of believers in Jesus gathers to remember and celebrate his baptism. There at the Jordan, John clarified his role as precursor of Jesus.
In the Christian Church Baptism is the first of the sacraments.
They had been baptized in John's baptism and then were re-baptized "in the name of the Lord Jesus." Paul laid hands on them and they received the Holy Spirit.