bang for the buck


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bang for (one's)/the buck

A lot of value for little cost. That restaurant is great, and the prices are very reasonable—you get a lot of bang for your buck. If we choose an affordable resort on this beautiful island, I think we'll get a lot of bang for the buck.
See also: bang, buck

bang for the buck

value for the money spent; excitement for the money spent; a favorable cost-to-benefit ratio. (Expressed as an amount of bang for the buck.) I didn't get anywhere near the bang for the buck I expected. How much bang for the buck did you really think you would get from a twelve-year-old car—at any price?
See also: bang, buck

bang for the buck

n. value for the money spent; excitement for the money spent; the cost-to-benefit ratio. How much bang for the buck did you really think you would get from a twelve-year-old car—at any price?
See also: bang, buck
References in periodicals archive ?
The top Best Bang for the Buck colleges in each of our five regions reflect a diverse group of institutions.
Logging 100MB into a $10 disk with a $199 drive was a lot of bang for the buck eight years ago.
Giving customers more bang for the buck was the theme of many compounding introductions at the show.
Presented the same weekend as the Joff rey's pricey, ponderous Billboards, the sleek Acid Psalms gave more bang for the buck. Never trust anyone over thirty.
In the hands of the right operator, that wood could get a lot more bang for the buck as ready to assemble furniture pieces, Gauvreau says.
The biggest bang for the buck, however, comes when companies invest in their people.
DONs are expected to get the most resident care "bang for the buck"; their employers presumably have these expectations, and most certainly their state survey agencies do.
Still, plenty of companies find ways to get a big bang for the buck from their intranets.
"It depends on the budget of the employer and what is the biggest bang for the buck."
Conceptualized in this way, mobility programs can only help in improving outcomes and thus getting "more bang for the buck." A sharpened focus on patients' mobility issues should be the goal of all post-acute programs.
Rather, it ties all of this together so that you know who, or what, is costing you the most, where you seem to be getting the "biggest bang for the buck" and where, conversely, the costs are exceeding your income.