bandwagon

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bandwagon fan

Someone who joins or supports something, usually a sports team, only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand the bandwagon fans who've come out of the woodwork now that the team is winning. Where were they during last year's awful season? I'm no bandwagon fan—I support these guys no matter what, win or lose!
See also: bandwagon, fan

climb on the bandwagon

To join, follow, or support someone or something only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just climb on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she's climbed on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, climb, on

get on the bandwagon

To join, follow, or support someone or something only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just get on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she decided to get on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, get, on

hop on the bandwagon

To join, follow, or support someone or something only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just hop on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she hopped on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, hop, on

jump on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just jump on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she decided to jump on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, jump, on

leap on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just leap on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she just leaped on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, leap, on

on the bandwagon

Having joined or following along with what is successful, popular, or common among the majority of people. I don't think most people actually care about his politics, they just like getting on the bandwagon of outrage. You're not a fan! You just climb on the bandwagon whenever the team is in the playoffs.
See also: bandwagon, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*on the bandwagon

Fig. on the popular side (of an issue); taking a popular position. (*Typically: be ~; climb ~; get ~; hop ~; jump ~.) You really should get on the bandwagon. Everyone else is. Jane has always had her own ideas about things. She's not the kind of person to jump on the bandwagon.
See also: bandwagon, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on the bandwagon, get

Also, climb or hop or jump on the bandwagon . Join a cause or movement, as in More and more people are getting on the bandwagon to denounce cigarette smoking. This expression alludes to a horse-drawn wagon carrying a brass band, used to accompany candidates on campaign tours in the second half of the 1800s. By about 1900 it was extended to supporting a campaign or other cause.
See also: get, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jump on the bandwagon

COMMON If someone jumps on the bandwagon, they suddenly become involved in an activity because it is likely to succeed or it is fashionable. There will always be people ready to jump on the bandwagon and start classes in whatever is fashionable, with little or no training. Why are so many stars now jumping on the fashionable green bandwagon?. Note: Verbs such as climb, get, leap and join are sometimes used instead of jump. A lot of people are climbing on the bandwagon of selling financial services to women. Note: These expressions are usually used in a disapproving way. Note: You can also say that someone is bandwagon-jumping. We welcome any campaign on safety issues, but we don't like the bandwagon-jumping of this organization. Note: Bandwagon is also used in other phrases such as someone's bandwagon is rolling, to mean that an activity or movement is getting increasing support. Major's team believe his bandwagon is rolling with support coming from both sides of the party. Note: In American elections in the past, political rallies often included a band playing on a horse-drawn wagon (= a covered vehicle pulled by horses). Politicians sat on the wagon and those who wanted to show their support climbed on it.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

jump on the bandwagon

join others in doing something or supporting a cause that is fashionable or likely to be successful.
Bandwagon was originally the US term for a large wagon able to carry a band of musicians in a procession.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

climb/jump on the ˈbandwagon

(informal, disapproving) do something that others are already doing because it is successful or fashionable: As soon as their policies became popular, all the other parties started to climb on the bandwagon.At political celebrations in the USA, there was often a band on a large decorated vehicle (= a bandwagon). If somebody joined a particular ‘bandwagon’, they publicly supported that politician in order to benefit from their success.
See also: bandwagon, climb, jump, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

on the bandwagon

mod. with the majority; following the latest fad. (Often with hop, get, climb, or jump.) Tom always has to climb on the bandwagon. He does no independent thinking.
See also: bandwagon, on
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

on the bandwagon, to get/climb/hop

To join the cause, movement, or party. The original bandwagon was a horse-drawn wagon bearing a brass band, used in a circus parade. In the second half of the nineteenth century such wagons began to be used in political campaigns as well, accompanying a candidate on speech-making tours. During William Jennings Bryan’s presidential campaign of 1900 the term began to be extended to mean supporting the movement itself. It also was used in Britain: “The Mirror . . . does not jump on bandwagons . . . it isn’t, never has been, and never will be a tin can tied to a political party’s tail” (Daily Mirror, 1966; cited by William Safire).
See also: climb, get, hop, on, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Bandwagoning for Profit: Bringing the Revisionist State Back In." International Security 19(Summer):72-107.