bandwagon


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climb on the bandwagon

To join, follow, or support someone or something only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just climb on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she's climbed on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, climb, on

get on the bandwagon

To join, follow, or support someone or something only after it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just get on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she decided to get on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, get, on

jump on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just jump on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she decided to jump on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, jump, on

leap on the bandwagon

To join or follow something once it is successful or popular. I can't stand these people who just leap on the bandwagon after a win. Where were they last year when the team was terrible? A: "I thought your mom hated that candidate." B: "Well, he's the president now, so she just leaped on the bandwagon."
See also: bandwagon, leap, on

on the bandwagon

Having joined or following along with what is successful, popular, or common among the majority of people. I don't think most people actually care about his politics, they just like getting on the bandwagon of outrage. You're not a fan! You just climb on the bandwagon whenever the team is in the playoffs.
See also: bandwagon, on
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*on the bandwagon

Fig. on the popular side (of an issue); taking a popular position. (*Typically: be ~; climb ~; get ~; hop ~; jump ~.) You really should get on the bandwagon. Everyone else is. Jane has always had her own ideas about things. She's not the kind of person to jump on the bandwagon.
See also: bandwagon, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

on the bandwagon, get

Also, climb or hop or jump on the bandwagon . Join a cause or movement, as in More and more people are getting on the bandwagon to denounce cigarette smoking. This expression alludes to a horse-drawn wagon carrying a brass band, used to accompany candidates on campaign tours in the second half of the 1800s. By about 1900 it was extended to supporting a campaign or other cause.
See also: get, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

jump on the bandwagon

COMMON If someone jumps on the bandwagon, they suddenly become involved in an activity because it is likely to succeed or it is fashionable. There will always be people ready to jump on the bandwagon and start classes in whatever is fashionable, with little or no training. Why are so many stars now jumping on the fashionable green bandwagon?. Note: Verbs such as climb, get, leap and join are sometimes used instead of jump. A lot of people are climbing on the bandwagon of selling financial services to women. Note: These expressions are usually used in a disapproving way. Note: You can also say that someone is bandwagon-jumping. We welcome any campaign on safety issues, but we don't like the bandwagon-jumping of this organization. Note: Bandwagon is also used in other phrases such as someone's bandwagon is rolling, to mean that an activity or movement is getting increasing support. Major's team believe his bandwagon is rolling with support coming from both sides of the party. Note: In American elections in the past, political rallies often included a band playing on a horse-drawn wagon (= a covered vehicle pulled by horses). Politicians sat on the wagon and those who wanted to show their support climbed on it.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

jump on the bandwagon

join others in doing something or supporting a cause that is fashionable or likely to be successful.
Bandwagon was originally the US term for a large wagon able to carry a band of musicians in a procession.
See also: bandwagon, jump, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

climb/jump on the ˈbandwagon

(informal, disapproving) do something that others are already doing because it is successful or fashionable: As soon as their policies became popular, all the other parties started to climb on the bandwagon.At political celebrations in the USA, there was often a band on a large decorated vehicle (= a bandwagon). If somebody joined a particular ‘bandwagon’, they publicly supported that politician in order to benefit from their success.
See also: bandwagon, climb, jump, on
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

on the bandwagon

mod. with the majority; following the latest fad. (Often with hop, get, climb, or jump.) Tom always has to climb on the bandwagon. He does no independent thinking.
See also: bandwagon, on
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

on the bandwagon, to get/climb/hop

To join the cause, movement, or party. The original bandwagon was a horse-drawn wagon bearing a brass band, used in a circus parade. In the second half of the nineteenth century such wagons began to be used in political campaigns as well, accompanying a candidate on speech-making tours. During William Jennings Bryan’s presidential campaign of 1900 the term began to be extended to mean supporting the movement itself. It also was used in Britain: “The Mirror . . . does not jump on bandwagons . . . it isn’t, never has been, and never will be a tin can tied to a political party’s tail” (Daily Mirror, 1966; cited by William Safire).
See also: climb, get, hop, on
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
In many ways, this is in the nature of bandwagons: Dan Rice was, after all, a circus clown.
9 in Tuckerman Hall, it's back to Jason Moran and the Bandwagon - his trio with bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits.
The CAB organiser at Llanelli, Mrs Carole Williams, agrees that a few small employers "seemed to have jumped on the redundancy bandwagon when no redundancy has taken place."
Nothing quite like spells out as we're getting on the bandwagon as much as not being able to explain why you're making the kind of radical change you've decided to make.
Summary: The Blackpool bandwagon rolls on with DJ Campbell scoring a second-half winner against Stoke at the Britannia Stadium.
to thank their the of Reeves It seems a lot of people with an anti-Catholic grudge are jumping on the bandwagon over this.
WHILE respecting the views of Ian F McGinnes of Redcar (Zetland's Excellent Track Record, 28.08.08), his comments on "politicians who jump on any headline-grabbing bandwagon that might be passing" has to be challenged.
and I'm including David Beckham on this one because he's jumped on the bandwagon today and that's exactly what they've done, footballers jumping on the bandwagon to beg whoever it is that has taken Madeleine McCann away, whoever has grabbed her, to give her back.
But then a bandwagon is a bandwagon wherever it comes from!
As The Times noted, other fight-wing groups saw the money pouring in and jumped quickly on the holiday bandwagon. Soon an array of "save Christmas" paraphernalia was available, including "Christmas bracelets, tree ornaments and lapel pins intended to send a defiant message to those who would turn December into a multicultural mush of 'winter parties,' 'seasonal sales' and 'Happy Holidays' greetings."
blinkx, the world's largest video search engine, has announced a partnership with Bandwagon, a music community site for fans of independent music.
She said campaigners did not want to be seen to "jump on the bandwagon" of the Russian spy poisoning case.
The whole world, it seems, has jumped on the Christopher Wheeldon bandwagon." Eagling has commissioned a ballet by Christopher Hampson ("the other Christopher"), and by David Dawson, a dancer whose choreographic talents Eagling cultivated while at DNB.
Jesse Jackson was one of the early black activists to jump on the green bandwagon. But Hayes and company have long realized the powerful political potential of the swelling U.S.
Yet again, Coun Todd is jumping, pathetically, on a bandwagon. Yet again, he distorts the facts for party political ends.