band


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Related to band: Bandeirantes
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Band-Aid solution

A quick and/or temporary solution to a problem that does not address or resolve the underlying cause of said problem. Taken from the Band-Aid brand of adhesive bandages. While offering free pizza to customers affected by the oil spill is a cute Band-Aid solution, the company has no plan in place to deal with the actual damage that it caused.
See also: solution

Band-Aid treatment

A method of covering up a problem, rather than solving it or getting to the root of it. Refers to the trademark for a brand of adhesive bandages. Honestly, I think this is just a Band-Aid treatment—we need to work harder and find a real solution.
See also: treatment

Band-Aid

A quick and usually ineffective solution to a problem that only addresses the symptom and not the root cause. Refers to the trademark for a brand of adhesive bandages. Primarily heard in US. Lowering educational standards in schools may increase graduation rates, but it does little more than slap a Band-Aid on a much deeper problem.

one-man band

A company or organization where most or all of the work is handled by one person. Most small businesses start out as a one-man band with the owner doing everything himself until he can afford to hire help.
See also: band

band together

To unite with others, often for a particular cause or reason. We all need to band together if we want to stop that bully. You guys will not beat this team unless you put aside your differences and band together.
See also: band, together

when the band begins to play

When the situation becomes serious, critical, chaotic, or troublesome. Our analysts have been predicting a market crash for months now. If we don't get diversify our assets soon, we're going to be in serious trouble when the band begins to play. My parents' relationship has been on the rocks for years. I just hope I'm out of the house when the band begins to play.
See also: band, begin, play

one-man show

1. A company or organization where most or all of the work is handled by one man. (Alternatively, "one-woman show.") My business started out as a one-man show. I did pretty much everything myself until I could afford to hire some help.
2. A theater performance that is written, directed, and performed by one man. (Alternatively, "one-woman show.") I heard Pete is doing his one-man show during the Fringe Festival next month!
See also: show

to beat the band

To a huge or the greatest possible extent or degree. They've been selling Girl Scout cookies to beat the band ever sense they set up shop right outside. The child started screaming to beat the band when her parents took away her cotton candy.
See also: band, beat

band together (against someone or something)

to unite in opposition to someone or something; to unite against someone or something. We must band together against the enemy. Everyone banded together to finish the cleanup work.
See also: band, together

one-man show

 
1. Lit. a performance put on by one person. It was a one-man show, but it was very entertaining. For a one-man show, it was very long.
2. Fig. an exhibition of the artistic works of one person. She is having a one-man show at the Northside Gallery. I'm having a one-man show next weekend. Come and see what I have done.
See also: show

strike up the band

 
1. Lit. to cause a (dance) band to start playing. Strike up the band, maestro, so we all can dance the night away.
2. Fig. to cause something to start. Strike up the band! Let's get this show on the road.
See also: band, strike, up

to beat the band

very briskly; very fast. He's selling computers to beat the band since he started advertising. She worked to beat the band to get ready for this.
See also: band, beat

one-man show

Also, one-man band. A person who does or manages just about everything, as in This department is a one-man show-the chairman runs it all, or John conducts the interviews, writes the articles, solicits ads, deals with the printer-he's a one-man band . This idiom alludes to the actor or artist responsible for the entire performance or exhibit, or the musician who plays every instrument in the group. [First half of 1900s]
See also: show

to beat the band

Also, to beat all. To the greatest possible degree. For example, The baby was crying to beat the band, or The wind is blowing to beat the band, or John is dressed up to beat all. This idiom uses beat in the sense of "surpass." The first term may, according to one theory, allude to a desire to arrive before the musicians who led a parade, so as to see the entire event. Another theory holds that it means "make more noise than (and thereby beat) a loud band." [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: band, beat

a one-man band

COMMON If you describe a man or an organization as a one-man band, you mean that one man does every part of an activity himself, without help from anyone else. He seemed to be a one-man band, taking orders, and cooking and serving at table. I'm a one-man band, Mr Herold. At present I haven't even got a secretary. Note: A woman who is like this is sometimes described as a one-woman band. I am no better at being in two places at once than the next one-woman band. Note: A one-man band is a street entertainer who plays several different instruments at the same time.
See also: band

when the band begins to play

when matters become serious.
See also: band, begin, play

to beat the band

in such a way as to surpass all competition. North American informal
1995 Patrick McCabe The Dead School He was polishing away to beat the band.
See also: band, beat

band together

v.
1. To form a cohesive and cooperative group; unite: The people who opposed the new policy banded together to fight it.
2. To cause some things or people to form into a cohesive or cooperative group; unite things or people: The fact that we all had gone to the same school banded us together, and we became good friends.
See also: band, together

one-man show

1. n. a performance put on by one person. It was a one-man show, but it was very entertaining.
2. n. an exhibition of the artistic works of one person. She is having a one-man show at the Northside Gallery.
See also: show

to beat the band

mod. very hard and very fast. He’s selling computers to beat the band since he started advertising.
See also: band, beat

to beat the band

To an extreme degree.
See also: band, beat
References in periodicals archive ?
At least 12 hours of rehearsal a week, and months of preparation, helped to prepare the band, which gets extra practice by playing all the band music for the NBC series ``Friday Night Lights.
What sets your band apart from the others out there?
Mica, ceramic, and mineral-oxide insulated band and nozzle heaters in one- and two-piece construction with several clamping and termination options for temperatures to 1500 F.
The "roller" rolls backward because of the following sequence: As the container moves forward, the rubber band untwists, Some of the stored energy gets converted into energy of motion.
In photo 5, we've applied the band to a chest press machine that already has a built-in variable resistance leverage system.
A performance of combined air force bands at the Japanese Military Band Festival at the Budokan Theater
More than any other band, the Grateful Dead was always more than just a band.
While I suppose it's terrific that other students attend band and choral concerts, I cannot tolerate the adolescent whooping, hollering and occasional screaming that occurs when a friend stands to take a four-bar choral solo during a sacred piece by Bach.
Often, Iliotibial Band Syndrome hits less experienced runners who increase mileage too fast.
Yorke would bring in his songs and the band would rehearse them for recording.
I don't think any of [the band members] had a problem with it.
If significant solidification occurs during filling and deformation occurs while the entire casting cross-section has reached a high fraction solid, the band may develop a high level of porosity in addition to segregation.
The Lounge Lizards were kind of a bebop-revisited-with-guitar band, although their founder, John Lurie, made a mistake early on in calling the band "fake jazz," which was enough to fool a lot of the jazz community into thinking they were goofing on jazz.
Based on a Columbus, Ohio, program, the HCPA began a police band that communicates a strong antidrug and alcohol message to the youth of the community.
The new De'Medici North Bay fur dressing plant, a joint venture of the Nipissing Band of Ojibways and an established firm of Italian fur dressers, De'Medici & Company of Milan, is scheduled to be completed by April 15.