balm in Gilead


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balm in Gilead

Cure or solace. The expression comes from the Book of Jeremiah (8:22): “Is there no balm in Gilead; is there no physician there?” The King James version translator took as “balm” the Hebrew word sori, which probably meant the resin of the mastic tree; John Wycliffe translated it as “gumme” and Miles Coverdale as “triacle” (treacle). By the nineteenth century, the term was used figuratively for consolation in a time of trouble, by Edgar Allan Poe (in “The Raven”), Charlotte Brontë, and others.
See also: balm
References in periodicals archive ?
Data was collected as part of a larger project that examined The Balm in Gilead, AIDS, and the Black Church in New York City.
However, The Balm in Gilead serves as the paradigm for examining the strategies used in creating a health social movement organization that targets religious institutions.
It seems simplistic to suggest that Ames is witnessing, but just like the spiritual, "There Is a Balm in Gilead," Ames dips into his own civilization and unites with all the other fiery wicks to glow together in a spiritual incandescence of jeremiadic drama--a perpetual destruction and reconstruction, with all the mystery of its inexplicable separation and restoration.
For an organizing packet, call the Balm in Gilead, (888) 225-6243.
Three of the six pieces in the second section also focus on Philadelphia; two of the remaining three are excellent surveys on the African American communities in Lancaster and Harrisburg, "No Balm in Gilead" by Leroy Hopkins and "Two Steps Forward, a Step-and-a-Half Back" by Gerald Eggert.
8:22 ("Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician there?"), he concludes: "Thus, Gilead in Transjordan had the distinction of producing balm.
In spite of some wild improbabilities and excessive efforts at uplift - there's not only balm in Gilead but even redemption - you may be moved more than you want to admit, especially by scenes of women bonding and the way in which the town finally comes together.
Balm in Gilead (1965), Wilson's first full-length play, is set in a crowded world of hustlers and junkies.
His longer works include Balm in Gilead (1964), The Rimers of Eldritch (1965), and This Is the Rill Speaking (1965).
Margaret Lawrence, did it is described in Balm in Gilead Journey of a Healer, a loving memoir written by her daughter, Sara Lawrence Lightfoot.
The vitality and complexity of mother daughter relationships is another theme of Balm in Gilead. By book's end it is clear that the writing of it helped Light foot better understand her connection to her mother: "I look into my mother's eyes and see my own reflections -not mirror images but refracted, valed." It is not a oneway mirror; Margaret Lawrence, too, sees her own reflection in her daughter's eyes.
Memorial contributions may be made to the "Balm in Gilead Ministries" which aides in the education of children in Zimbabwe, Africa.
Three friends are the creative forces behind a production of Lanford Wilson's gritty "Balm in Gilead," opening Thursday at the Lord Leebrick Theatre.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to SWCRC "Life Skills," 44 Morris Street, Webster, MA 01570 or to the Balm in Gilead, P.O.