bag of wind


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bag of wind

Someone who speaks at too great a length, saying little of value and often with an air of pretentious authority. Mr. Smith likes to expound at great length on any given topic, but he's just an overblown bag of wind.
See also: bag, of, wind

bag of wind

verb
See also: bag, of, wind
References in periodicals archive ?
I AGREE with FSH, of Newcastle, about the amount of money so-called professional footballers get these days for kicking a bag of wind around for 90 minutes.
Despite all that has happened to him in the past nine months, Kelvin Davis tells Stuart Rayner he refuses to get carried away by the highs, lows and contradictions of fending off a bag of wind.
Takes his seat, whistle goes, 22 players chase bag of wind, yada yada yada.
If the idea of 22 grown men kicking a bag of wind around a pitch leaves you cold, then Post Style can offer a helping hand.
Forget the Swansea thing, it was nice to see the greatest footballer to have ever kicked a bag of wind on a Welsh field being made a fuss of.
Secondly, I take issue with his offensive remark about 22 men kicking a bag of wind about.
We've no interest in overpaid blokes kicking a bag of wind
However, when your job is kicking a bag of wind about and you are being paid about PS150,000 per week to do so, the fans should expect decent performances and not the utter tripe that we have had to endure in almost every tournament since 1966.
Most football fans tune in to watch Match of the Day because they want to see the bit where 22 men chase a bag of wind around a pitch.
WATCHING football today tends to make me sick over the money players get for kicking a bag of wind around a field for 90 minutes.
His favourite phrase was: "It's just 22 lads kicking a bag of wind - anything can happen."
But he's not up to much except kicking a bag of wind around a football pitch.
I have been a football fan for 40 years but it is only a game where 22 men chase a bag of wind up and down a field.
But seriously, working in a nick can't be a walk in a park, so why should standing on a touch-line in an Armani trench-coat watching 22 blokes kick a bag of wind around be stressful?