bag and baggage


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bag and baggage

With all of one's possessions. You need to be out of your dorm room, bag and baggage, by Monday morning.
See also: and, bag, baggage
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bag and baggage

 and part and parcel
with one's luggage; with all one's possessions. Sally showed up at our door bag and baggage one Sunday morning. All right, if you won't pay the rent, out with you, bag and baggage! Get all your stuff—part and parcel—out of here!
See also: and, bag, baggage
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bag and baggage

All of one's belongings, especially with reference to departing with them; completely, totally. For example, The day he quit his job, John walked out, bag and baggage. Originating in the 1400s, this phrase at first meant an army's property, and to march off bag and baggage meant that the departing army was not leaving anything behind for the enemy's use. By the late 1500s, it had been transferred to other belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bag and baggage

with all your belongings.
See also: and, bag, baggage
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌbag and ˈbaggage

with all your belongings: If you don’t pay the rent, you’ll be thrown out, bag and baggage.
See also: and, bag, baggage
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bag and baggage

1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
See also: and, bag, baggage
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bag and baggage

All one’s belongings, usually in the sense of departing with them. It originally was a military phrase that meant all of an army’s property and was so used in the fifteenth century. To march away with bag and baggage meant that the army was leaving but was surrendering nothing to the enemy. The alliterative nature of the term has appealed to many writers, including Shakespeare. In As You Like It Touchstone says, “Come, shepherd, let us make an honourable retreat; though not with bag and baggage, yet with scrip and scrippage,” meaning the purse and its contents (money). In time the connotation of honorable departure was dropped and the term simply described clearing out completely. “‘Bag and baggage,’ said she, ‘I’m glad you’re going,’” declared Samuel Richardson’s heroine in Pamela (1741). See also kit and caboodle.
See also: and, bag, baggage
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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