backward


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Related to backward: Backward Integration

backward(s) about coming forward

Reticent or unwilling to voice one's opinion; shy. I've always been a bit backward about coming forward when it comes to my religious beliefs. Mary is in no way backward about coming forward; she'll tell you exactly what is on her mind.
See also: coming, forward

backward(s) and forward(s)

Back and forth; moving in one direction and then the opposite. Can be used literally to refer to something or someone moving in such a way, or figuratively to refer to a situation in which no progress is made (e.g., an argument). I was pacing backwards and forwards in my room last night, worrying about this morning's exam. The two candidates debated the gun laws backward and forward, but neither could offer a productive solution in the end.
See also: and

ass-backwards

rude slang Dysfunctional, regressive, and/or bizarre. The school board is so ass-backwards! Can you believe they took away our school's art program?

fall over backward

To expend a lot of energy or effort to do something; to inconvenience oneself. I can't believe how ungrateful you're being, especially since we fell over backward planning this dinner party for you! Please don't fall over backward preparing for my visit—I'm totally prepared to sleep on your floor!
See also: backward, fall, over

back and forth

1. adjective In one direction and then another in an alternating fashion. During the party, I went back and forth to the kitchen to get drinks for the guests. The kids are outside throwing the baseball back and forth. The union and management are still going back and forth in the contract negotiation.
2. noun An argument or discussion in which two or more people alternate in sharing their perspectives. They're having a real back and forth up there—can you hear them yelling? I think we should have a little back and forth before we make a final decision.
See also: and, back, forth

be (not) backward in coming forward

To be reluctant or hesitant to voice one's opinion. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I should have known that Josh would criticize my entire paper—he's not backward in coming forward. Patty tends to be backward in coming forward, so I don't think she'll say anything tonight.
See also: backward, coming, forward

bend over backwards

1. Literally, to lean backwards. I'm so sore after bending over backwards and doing all those weird stretches at yoga this morning.
2. To exert a lot of effort towards some end. This phrase is often used to express frustration when one's efforts go unrecognized. I have been bending over backwards to make sure that you have a wonderful visit, and you don't even care! The entire staff really needs to bend over backwards while the CEO is visiting our office.
See also: backward, bend, over

know (something) backwards

To be extremely familiar with a particular subject, field, or piece of writing, film, music, etc. Primarily heard in UK. I've read this book so many times, I know it backwards. You should ask Samantha about your car. She knows engines backwards.
See also: backward, know

without a backward glance

Without any reservations, remorse, or regret. Often used to describe leaving a place or situation. Likened to literally leaving somewhere without turning around to look at it one last time. I could leave this town without a backward glance—there's no reason for me to stay here. I thought he really loved working here, so it was strange when he up and resigned without a backward glance.
See also: backward, glance, without

lean over backwards

1. Literally, to bend backwards. I'm so sore after leaning over backwards and doing all those weird stretches at yoga this morning.
2. To exert a lot of effort toward some end. This phrase is often used to express frustration when one's efforts go unrecognized. I have been leaning over backwards to make sure that you have a wonderful visit, and you don't even care! The entire staff really needs to lean over backwards while the CEO is visiting our office.
See also: backward, lean, over

know (something) backwards and forwards

To be extremely familiar with a particular subject, field, or piece of writing, film, music, etc. I've read this book so many times, I know it backwards and forwards. You should ask Samantha about the issue—she knows car engines backwards and forwards.
See also: and, backward, forwards, know

know (something) backward

To be extremely familiar with a particular subject, field, or piece of writing, film, music, etc. Primarily heard in US. I've read this book so many times, I know it backward. You should ask Samantha about your problem—she knows car engines backward.
See also: backward, know

know (something) backward and forward

To be extremely familiar with a particular subject, field, or piece of writing, film, music, etc. Primarily heard in US. I've read this book so many times, I know it backward and forward. You should ask Samantha about the issue; she knows car engines backward and forward.
See also: and, backward, forward, know

move backward

1. To move to a position or in the direction directly behind oneself. I moved backward in alarm when the patient began convulsing. I didn't have space to turn the car around, so I had to move backward to get out of the alleyway.
2. To cause or compel someone or something to move to a position or in the direction directly behind them. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "move" and "backward." The teacher moved me backward a few steps so that I was in line with everyone else. I can't move this thing backward without being able to see behind me!
See also: backward, move

lean over backward

To expend a lot of energy or effort to do something; to inconvenience oneself. I can't believe how ungrateful you're being, especially since we leaned over backward planning this dinner party for you! Please don't lean over backward preparing for my visit—I'm totally prepared to sleep on your floor!
See also: backward, lean, over

back and forth

in one direction and then the other repeatedly; from one place to another repeatedly. We tossed the ball back and forth between us. The tiger paced back and forth in its cage.
See also: and, back, forth

bend over backwards

(to do something) Go to fall over backwards (to do something).
See also: backward, bend, over

bend over backwards (to do something) (for someone)

Fig. to work very hard to accomplish something for someone; to go out of one's way (to do something) (for someone). He will bend over backwards to help you. I bent over backwards for you, and you showed no thanks!
See also: backward, bend, over

fall over backwards (to do something)

 and bend over backwards (to do something); lean over backwards (to do something)
Fig. to do everything possible to please someone. The taxi driver fell over backwards to be helpful. The teacher bent over backwards to help the students understand. You don't have to lean over backwards to get me to help. Just ask.
See also: backward, fall, over

know something backwards and forwards and know something forwards and backwards

Fig. to know something very well; to know a passage of language so well that one could recite it backwards as well as forwards. Of course I've memorized my speech. I know it backwards and forwards.
See also: and, backward, forwards, know

lean over backwards

(to do something) Go to fall over backwards (to do something).
See also: backward, lean, over

back and forth

Also, backward(s) and forward(s). To and fro, moving in one direction and then the opposite and so making no progress in either. For example, The clock pendulum swung back and forth. The term is also used figuratively, as in The lawyers argued the point backwards and forwards for an entire week. [c. 1600]
See also: and, back, forth

backward and forward

Also, backwards and forwards.
1. Same as back and forth.
2. Thoroughly, completely, as in He read the speech over and over, until he knew it backwards and forwards. [Late 1500s]
See also: and, backward, forward

bend over backwards

Also, lean over backwards. Exert oneself to the fullest extent, as in Dad bent over backwards so as not to embarrass Stasia's new boyfriend. This phrase transfers the gymnastic feat of a backbend to taking a great deal of trouble for someone or something. [c. 1920] Also see under fall all over.
See also: backward, bend, over

fall all over oneself

Also, fall over backwards. Make an inordinate effort to do something, try very hard or eagerly. For example, They fell all over themselves to be helpful, but only got in the way, or She fell over backwards trying to please her boss, but it got her nowhere. The first of these hyperbolic expressions dates from the late 1800s, the second from the mid-1900s.
See also: all, fall, over

know like a book

Also, know like the back of one's hand or know backwards and forwards. Be extremely familiar with or knowledgeable about; understand perfectly. For example, I know Greg like a book-I'm sure he'll come, or I know this town like the back of my hand, or John knew his part backwards and forwards. The first of these hyperbolic idioms, dating from the early 1800s, has a close cousin in read like a book, which means "to discern someone's intent," as in I can read Greg like a book; also see under open book. The second ( back of hand) dates only from the mid-1900s. Also see backwards and forwards, def. 2; inside out, def. 2; know all the answers.
See also: book, know, like

bend over backwards

or

bend over backward

COMMON If you bend over backwards or bend over backward, you try very hard to help or please someone, even though it causes you trouble. We bent over backwards to make them feel welcome and they didn't thank us once. Note: You can also say that someone leans over backwards or leans over backward. You've done your duty — you've leaned over backwards. She has nothing to complain about.
See also: backward, bend, over

know something backwards

mainly BRITISH or

know something backwards and forwards

mainly AMERICAN
If you know a subject backwards, you know a lot about it. I thoroughly enjoy lecturing and know my subject backwards. He will be very much in demand. He knows the business backwards. They know company personnel policy backwards and forwards.
See also: backward, know, something

bend over backwards to do something

make every effort, especially to be fair or helpful. informal

know something backwards

be entirely familiar with something.
1991 William Trevor Reading Turgenev People who lived in the town knew it backwards.
See also: backward, know, something

bend/lean over ˈbackwards to do something

try very hard to help or please somebody: I’ve bent over backwards to be nice to her, but she’s pushed me too far now.

ˌback and ˈforth

(also ˌbackwards and ˈforwards) in one direction and then in the opposite one, repeatedly: The rope swung back and forth from the branch.She travels backwards and forwards between the factory and head office.
See also: and, back, forth

know somebody/something ˈbackwards

(informal, especially British English) know somebody/something extremely well: He must know the play backwards by now — he’s seen it six times!

bend/lean over backward, to

To exert oneself enormously, to go to a great deal of trouble to satisfy or please someone. Originating in the United States about 1920, this expression, with its image of straining to do a backbend, is well on its way to cliché status.
See also: bend, lean, over

lean over backward

See bend over backward.
See also: backward, lean, over
References in periodicals archive ?
Achieving a simple, stylish look is exactly why Cari Shane turned her books backward. Four years ago, the public relations executive was renovating a 1914 row house in Washington, D.C., when her teenage daughter suggested the idea.
By this token, no matter how high the income is of a backward caste person, he or she will always be poor in the government's eyes - though not to his or her neighbours - and in need of clutches for securing jobs and education.
Energetic expenditure and net efficiency comparisons between forward and backward movements were determining using two-tailed Student's paired t-test.
BJP is not in favour of any reconsideration of reservation being extended to SCs, STs, backward and extremely backward castes.
(4) When [[omega].sub.1] = w, [[omega].sub.2] = 0, and [tau] = [omega], we obtain the backward SOR iterative method.
On Figure 1 the probability of backward scattering p(g) is plotted as function of "average cosine" g together with the probability of backward scattering in 1D model (g = <cos [theta]> = cos 0 * (1 - p) + cos [pi] * p = 1 - 2p-dotted line).
We say f is forward continuous at x [member of] X, respectively backward continuous, if, for every [epsilon] >0, there exists [delta] > 0 such that y [member of] [B.sup.
Additionally, a 2x2 repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with group (MS versus Control) and walking direction (forward versus backward) as the factors was used to analyze performance on the WLG task.
The Government has envisaged several programmes and schemes related to economic, social political empowerment of people belonging to backward classes and religious minorities.
Similarly, from an anatomical perspective, there is the logical rationale for possible success of a backward walking intervention (8,17).
When the GRF passes anterior to the COM, a backward moment is applied about the COM, thereby creating backward angular impulse.
For each input linguistic variable, we define 3 linguistic values: small, medium, big , and for each output we define 7 linguistic values: backward fast, backward medium, backward slow, stop, forward slow, forward medium, forward fast (Popescu, 2006).
He hits the bottom of the cue ball to make it spin backward, even as it moves forward.
Romantic and slow, both casts--Barbara Bears and Ian Casady, and Mireille Hassenboehler and Sergio Torrado--float along, often traveling backward. The man ultimately pulls the woman into the familiar fish dive, exiting by walking backward.
My rat got so frustrated when he couldn't get any food by pushing that he developed a neurotic ritual: He would turn to the left three times while throwing his little ratty head around and then sort of fall over backward. A useless rat.