back order

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back order

1. noun An item that is not currently available for sale but can be ordered. No, that dress is sold out, but we can make it a back order for you.
2. verb To order an item that is not currently available for sale. No, that dress is sold out, but we can back order it for you.
See also: back, order

back-order something

[for a merchant] to order something that is not in stock and make delivery to the customer when the goods become available. The store didn't have the replacement part for my vacuum cleaner, so the manager back-ordered it for me. The shop had to back-order some of the items on my list.

back order

An item not currently in stock but to be sold or delivered when it becomes available, as in We don't have the shoes in white, but we can make them a back order. The verb back-order means "to obtain such an item," as in The furniture store is going to back-order the sofa for us.
See also: back, order
References in periodicals archive ?
The buyer's ordering quantity was obtained larger at cooperation against the noncooperation ([lambda] > 1) with respect to some conditions related to holding and backordering cost.
Hsu, "An EOQ model with imperfect quality items, inspection errors, shortage backordering, and sales returns," International Journal of Production Economics, vol.
This issue is important for discussing the differences in backordering costs and the discussion about different demand classes in the second part of the case.
costs of lost sales, backordering costs, differing service level contracts.
it]: Unit cost of Backordering item 'i', which was demanded during the period 't' [CAP.
In an ideal situation, as assumed in the existing model of economic order quantity with partial backordering (EOQ-PBO), the customer will instantly revisit the store and fetch the backordered computer exactly at the next replenishment point [1, 2].
Assuming that a fraction of unsatisfied customers incurring stockouts is willing to backorder their demand and be satisfied by the next replenishment led to the problem of EOQ with partial backordering (EOQ-PBO) [1].
Recently, the problem was extended to consider prepayment, delayed payment, linear and fixed backordering costs, discounts, and so forth [30-33].
The above literature shows that most variants of the EOQ-PBO model are focused on different patterns of demand rate or backordering rate.