back order

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back order

1. noun An item that is not currently available for sale but can be ordered. No, that dress is sold out, but we can make it a back order for you.
2. verb To order an item that is not currently available for sale. No, that dress is sold out, but we can back order it for you.
See also: back, order

back-order something

[for a merchant] to order something that is not in stock and make delivery to the customer when the goods become available. The store didn't have the replacement part for my vacuum cleaner, so the manager back-ordered it for me. The shop had to back-order some of the items on my list.

back order

An item not currently in stock but to be sold or delivered when it becomes available, as in We don't have the shoes in white, but we can make them a back order. The verb back-order means "to obtain such an item," as in The furniture store is going to back-order the sofa for us.
See also: back, order
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore many papers addressing backordering in the newsvendor model have appeared in the operations management scope recently.
In the right-hand side of (1), the first term denotes the sales income, the second term is the ordering cost, the third term is the salvage income from the excess orders, and the last term is the profit from backordering.
We consider a continuous review environment and allow for free waiting time in this paper.) after placing their order into account and formulate the inventory control problem as a "partial backordering optimal inventory control problem." Observe that quite many prior studies have explored the partial backorder issue in inventory management.
For the backordering cost b, when it increases, backorder is being penalized more, and hence both r and Q increase, which also yields a higher cost C.
To manage these adversities, manufacturers and wholesalers usually increase the flexibility in their inventory systems by adopting a mix of emergency lateral transshipment (LT) from other warehouses at a higher cost, while at the same time backordering from their usual suppliers to match the stochastic demand.
Rule a: Purchasing, backordering, and holding costs have a crucial impact on LT decision.
The system costs are sum of fixed ordering cost and holding and partial backordering costs.
In this study, multiperiod and multilevel production systems under lead-time uncertainties, periodic order quantity (POQ) policy, and partial backordering were considered.
This issue is important for discussing the differences in backordering costs and the discussion about different demand classes in the second part of the case.
The multiple demand class issue becomes important when different groups of customers, or demand classes, have different service restrictions with the supplier e.g., costs of lost sales, backordering costs, differing service level contracts.
[CBO.sub.it]: Unit cost of Backordering item 'i', which was demanded during the period 't' [CAP.sub.it]: Capacity available to produce item 'i' during the period 't' [CAPT.sub.t]: Capacity available in time units, in a period 't' [D.sub.it]: Demand of item 'i' during the period 't' [PT.sub.i]: Time required to process the item 'i' [ST.sub.i]: Time required to setup the production for item 'i'
The supply line level is initially set at 80 in Short Games and 200 in Long Games so that no backordering occurs even when the decision-maker does not order goods during the first four decision intervals (at the end of which the disturbance in customer demand causes disequilibrium).
In real life, 'safety stocks' are determined by balancing the inventory holding and backordering costs.
The buyer's ordering quantity was obtained larger at cooperation against the noncooperation ([lambda] > 1) with respect to some conditions related to holding and backordering cost.
In an ideal situation, as assumed in the existing model of economic order quantity with partial backordering (EOQ-PBO), the customer will instantly revisit the store and fetch the backordered computer exactly at the next replenishment point [1, 2].