back the wrong horse

back the wrong horse

To support a person or an effort that fails. This expression refers to betting on horse races. You really backed the wrong horse when you picked that swimmer to win the race—he didn't even medal! Politicians who backed the wrong horse in the election are now trying to curry favor with the winning candidate—without much success.
See also: back, horse, wrong

back the wrong horse

Fig. to support someone or something that cannot win or succeed. I don't want to back the wrong horse, but it seems to me that Jed is the better candidate. Fred backed the wrong horse in the budget hearings.
See also: back, horse, wrong

back the wrong horse

Also, bet on the wrong horse. Guess wrongly or misjudge a future outcome, as in Jones garnered only a few hundred votes; we obviously backed the wrong horse, or Counting on the price of IBM to rise sharply was betting on the wrong horse. Transferred from wagering money on a horse that fails to win the race, a usage dating from the late 1600s, this term is widely applied to elections and other situations of uncertain outcome.
See also: back, horse, wrong

back the wrong horse

If you back the wrong horse, you support someone or something that fails in business or in a contest, election, etc. He backed the wrong horse in the recent Tory leadership contest. The PM has wasted no time in sending the pro-euro camp a signal that they've backed the wrong horse. Note: Verbs such as bet on or pick or phrases such as put money on can be used instead of back. Betting on takeovers can backfire if you pick the wrong horse.
See also: back, horse, wrong

back the wrong horse

make a wrong or inappropriate choice.
See also: back, horse, wrong

ˌback the wrong ˈhorse

(British English) support the person, group etc. that later loses a contest or fails to do what was expected: I certainly backed the wrong horse when I said United would win the Cup Final.Many people who had voted for the party in the election were now feeling that they had backed the wrong horse.
In horse racing, if you back the wrong horse you bet money on a horse that does not win the race.
See also: back, horse, wrong

back the wrong horse

Make a wrong guess about a future outcome. The term comes from horse racing and is occasionally put as bet on the wrong horse, and has been used in this context since the late seventeenth century. It has long been applied to other situations, especially politics, where it means supporting a candidate who loses. Charles L. Graves used it in Punch’s History (1922): “Lord Salisbury made his remarkable speech about our having backed the wrong horse, i.e. Turkey in the Crimean War.”
See also: back, horse, wrong
References in periodicals archive ?
But Murphy turned on long-term critic McCluskey and fellow Unite bosses yesterday, saying they would "back the wrong horse in a one-horse race".
He added: "Len McCluskey and the Unite leadership in London are the type of people who could back the wrong horse in a one-horse race.
For more call 09050 700 446 77p per minute Pisces Feb 20 - Mar 20 Feb 20 - Mar 20 SOME chit-chat and gossip at chit-chat and gossip at work could be right or it could be work could be right or it could be so wrong you end up making a so wrong you end up making a real fool of yourself if you choose real fool of yourself if you choose to listen or worse still, back the to listen or worse still, back the wrong horse. Remain true to type, emain true to type, avoid no matter how juicy.
back the wrong horse or because they have not found a way of communicating their message in a way which would inspire donations
So why should the government sell now at pounds 265m?" Racecourse Association chairman Ian Barlow, the third signatory to racing's SIP-supporting letters to the government, reacted to inevitable criticism that racing had managed to back the wrong horse twice by saying: "We've always worked on the principle of trying to the best for racing.
Given that "Shutter Island" has made almost as much in its first three days as "The Lovely Bones" ($43 million) has after a month in wide release, did the studio back the wrong horse, especially since films released early in the year rarely receive Oscar attention
Will they guarantee that investors hoping for a high return will not lose if they back the wrong horse?
If you back the wrong horse you end up with someone else's choice.
I hope there are others like MacGregor, in senior positions, who understand how crucial it is not to back the wrong horse. If they do our game might never be able to recover.