back of


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(in) back of (something)

Behind something. There was some more honey in the cabinet—I found it in back of all the cereal boxes.
See also: back, of

back of

Also, at the back of; in back of. Behind; also, supporting. For example, The special brands were stored back of the counter, or "Franklin stood back of me in everything I wanted to do" (Eleanor Roosevelt, quoted by Catherine Drinker Bowen, Atlantic Monthly, March 1970). The first term, dating from the late 1600s, was long criticized as an undesirable colloquialism but today is generally considered acceptable. The variants, at the back of, from about 1400, and in back of, from the early 1900s, also can be used both literally and figuratively and could be substituted for back of in either example. Also see back of beyond.
See also: back, of
References in classic literature ?
Swiftwater Bill stood up, clinging with one hand to the back of the front seat and waving the other to attract her attention.
Descending from the table, she left the parlour, and went upstairs, intending to enter the room overhead, which was the bedchamber at the back of the drawing-room.
They crossed a room filled with sailors of all nations drinking; ascended a staircase at the back of the house, and stopped at the door of the room on the second floor.
You can find it by placing both your hands on your hipbones and sliding your thumbs down floe back of your pelvis, heading toward making a letter V.
The changes to the back of the die proposed by the designer for the next computer simulation are shown by the red line, which opens up regions of low velocity and restricts regions of high velocity.
Back leg swing: Stand behind a chair with your hands on the back of the chair.
Lengthen the back of your neck, bringing your chin toward your chest until your head lifts.