baby


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
References in classic literature ?
what a vast mysterious place it must seem to baby eyes
I would have loved my baby so--and cared for it so tenderly--and tried to give her every chance for good.
Huddled in the stern of the boat she sat with her baby strained close to her bosom, and because of that little tender, helpless thing she was happier tonight than she had been for many a sorrow-ridden day.
Even though she knew not to what fate she was going, or how soon that fate might overtake her, still was she happy and thankful for the moment, however brief, that she might press her baby tightly in her arms.
Whether flat on her stomach, or head down, heels in the air, the Simpson baby knew she was in the hands of an expert, and continued gurgling placidly while aunt Jane regarded the pantomime with a kind of dazed awe.
The baby was lying with its head thrown back, stiffening itself in the nurse's arms, and would not take the plump breast offered it; and it never ceased screaming in spite of the double hushing of the wet-nurse and the other nurse, who was bending over her.
Or perhaps,' Mr Inspector hinted, 'if the lady was to step up-stairs, and take a look at baby now
the Duchess said to Alice, flinging the baby at her as she spoke.
Tess, having quickly eaten her own meal, beckoned to her eldest sister to come and take away the baby, fastened her dress, put on the buff gloves again, and stooped anew to draw a bond from the last completed sheaf for the tying of the next.
One of the little girls, a mere mite who seemed to have prematurely taken upon herself some charge of the others, stepped out of her place by me, and danced to and from the baby until it left off crying, and laughed.
She spoke of the boarding-house in which she had taken a room, of the weather and the baby, told him she had been for a walk on the front with a lady-friend whom she had met in the boarding-house and who had taken such a fancy to baby, she was going to the theatre on Saturday night, and Brighton was filling up.
Morleena was a fine baby,' remarked Mr Kenwigs; as if this were rather an attack, by implication, upon the family.
Madame Valmonde had not seen Desiree and the baby for four weeks.
And it darted into me like lightning--I'd lay the baby there and cover it with the grass and the chips.
I have dreams of having a little cottage built there, with the daisies up to the door, and no path of any sort-- just big enough to hold myself and one baby inside and a purple clematis outside.