babe in arms

babe in arms

1. An infant. (Based on the fact that an infant is typically carried in an adult's arms). Let me see that precious babe in arms!
2. A person who is gullible, naïve, or lacks experience in a specific situation. Although Jane had always excelled in school, she felt like a babe in arms when she began attending college.
See also: arm, babe

babe in arms

 
1. Lit. a very young baby that is carried by an adult. I have known that since I was a babe in arms! A young mother with a babe in arms stood in line with the rest of the students.
2. Fig. an innocent or naive person. He's a babe in arms when it comes to taking girls out. Mary has no idea how to win the election. Politically she's a babe in arms.
See also: arm, babe

babe in arms

An infant, as in She's been a family friend since I was a babe in arms. Although the word "babe" for baby has been used since the 1300s, this phrase describing a child too young to walk (and hence having to be carried) dates only from about 1900.
See also: arm, babe

a babe in arms

mainly BRITISH
If you describe someone as a babe in arms, you mean that they are very young. The family have always cycled, and Chris has been going to races since he was a babe in arms. I first appeared on stage as a babe in arms, and my mother just assumed I would become an actor. Note: `Babe' is an old-fashioned word for a baby or small child.
See also: arm, babe

babe in arms

1 an innocent, inexperienced, or gullible person. 2 something very young or new.
2 2005 Lee Marshall Travel Intelligence Compared to the French Riviera – which is the Olduvai Gorge of Sunbathing Man – the Costa Smeralda is a babe in arms.
See also: arm, babe

a ˌbabe in ˈarms

(old-fashioned)
1 a very young baby not able to walk or crawl
2 a helpless, an inexperienced or an innocent person: He’s a babe in arms in financial matters.
See also: arm, babe
References in classic literature ?
The telephone business did not really begin to grow big and overspread the earth until 1896, but the keynote of expansion was first sounded by Theodore Vail in the earliest days, when as yet the telephone was a babe in arms.
Whirling the ape-man across a hairy shoulder, as easily as you or I might lift a babe in arms, Bolgani turned and dashed out into the open, racing toward the great trees.