avowed intent

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avowed intent

A solemn public promise or pledge toward some goal or achievement. The presidential nominee gave her avowed intent to reform the public school system should she be elected.
See also: intent
References in periodicals archive ?
The only avowed socialist in Congress has regularly charged that the Chairman always sides with "the wealthy and large corporations.
The group also avowed that they were allies and not competitors, and thus, future discussions about mutual concerns could only benefit them all.
Rastafarian and Muslim inmates, on behalf of a c]ass of inmates whose avowed religious beliefs forbid them from cutting their hair or shaving their beards, sued District of Columbia and federal prison officials.
DeLay, an avowed opponent of church-state separation, believes court rulings on school prayer, abortion and other social issues have alienated the nation from God and necessitate national repentance.
Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is the first avowed Communist to appear on a U.
with] the position of the Boy Scouts of America concerning avowed homosexuals as scout leaders.
We believe an avowed homosexual is not a role model for the values espoused in the Scout Oath and Law.
Amid the riot of centuries and ideas, there are only a few places where Allen's avowed lack of specialization mars the analysis.
com AG under its avowed strategy to assemble a portfolio of internet holdings.
Put another way, to what extent are the presumed liberatory capacities of literature and criticism primarily a dream of the academic imagination (of whatever avowed ideological persuasion), born of a desire to rationalize or legitimate the position of the academic herself or himself?
I go to the cafe to create my relationships," the defiant murder suspect Sebastien Billoir avowed during an 1876 pretrial investigation.
Ann Douglas argues in Terrible Honesty that the often unspoken but nonetheless avowed project of many writers, musicians, and architects in the 1920s was cultural matricide: the overthrow of Victorian, bourgeois codes of decorum, propriety, and restraint too often associated with a stereotype of the proper, overly judgmental, upper-middle-class matriarch.
At first its avowed intention was to present poetry, foreign and domestic news, and accounts of gallantry, pleasure, and entertainment.
His avowed acceptance of the interdependence of the world, of the priority of all-human values over class values, and of the indivisibility of common security marked a revolutionary ideological change.
This old consumerism wouldn't be necessary if the mass media were completely effective in their avowed role as watchdog and informant.