attorney

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an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client

proverb Choosing to represent yourself in court rather than hiring a lawyer is usually very unwise. A: "I'm licensed and all, so I'm just going to represent myself. What's the problem?" B: "Well, you know what they say—an attorney who represents himself has a fool for a client."

jailhouse attorney

slang An inmate of a prison or jail who is or has become knowledgeable enough about the law to provide legal advice or representation to themselves or others. I couldn't afford to hire a lawyer, and the state was too slow providing me with one, so I had to rely on a couple of jailhouse attorneys I met in the slammer to help me file my appeal. I really would recommend hiring a real lawyer. You shouldn't be basing your case on what some jailhouse attorney is telling you.
See also: attorney, jailhouse

strike (one) from the roll (of solicitors/attorneys)

To be banned from practicing as a solicitor or attorney. The judge ruled that the only way to protect public confidence in the legal system was to strike him from the roll for his unprofessional and immoral behavior. Thompson is appealing the court's decision to strike her from the roll of attorneys as new evidence suggests her implication in the crime may have been fabricated by others.
See also: roll, solicitor, strike

strike (one) off the roll (of solicitors/attorneys)

To be banned from practicing as a solicitor or attorney. The judge ruled that the only way to protect public confidence in the legal system was to strike him off the roll for his unprofessional and immoral behavior. Thompson is appealing the court's decision to strike her off the roll of attorneys as new evidence suggests her implication in the crime may have been fabricated by others.
See also: off, roll, solicitor, strike
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But one might ask how important were family connections in recruiting attorneys and whether attorneyship became a family profession that passed from generation to generation as in the case of the Earl of Harewood's attorneys Lewis and George Cuthbert?
Instruction was but one form by which representation in the colonies was kept "actual," a form of attorneyship, as distinct from the virtual representation celebrated in Burke's description of Parliament as "a deliberative assembly of one nation, with one interest, that of the whole, where, not local purposes, not local prejudices ought to guide, but the general Good, resulting from the general reason of the whole." BERNARD BAILYN, THE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN POLITICS 84-85 (1968) (quoting Edmund Burke's speech to the electors of Bristol in 1774).