attitude

(redirected from attitudinally)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to attitudinally: pertaining, proceed with, reared
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

attitude-adjuster

A club that can be used to make people comply, often a police officer's baton. Although the officer threatened to use his attitude-adjuster, the group of teens didn't seem remotely scared. In the midst of the chaos was a police officer using his attitude-adjuster to try to direct traffic.

cop an attitude

slang To act irritably. Don't cop an attitude with me, young lady, or I'll take away your allowance! All of a sudden, John copped an attitude—I guess he was unhappy with the change in plans.
See also: attitude, cop

devil-may-care attitude

A nonchalant attitude, especially toward risks or consequences. I can't believe he went out on his motorcycle in this rain. His devil-may-care attitude is going to get him killed. If you keep up this devil-may-care attitude toward your money, you'll be broke in no time.
See also: attitude

have a bad attitude

To tend to be pessimistic. I know I can have a bad attitude, so I'm trying to be more positive these days. If she didn't have such a bad attitude, she could definitely be as good a musician as her sisters.
See also: attitude, bad, have

pull an attitude (with one)

To act in an impertinent, disrespectful, or haughty manner (toward one). That cop would have let us go if you hadn't pulled an attitude with her, you idiot! We knew better than to ever pull an attitude with our mom.
See also: attitude, pull

strike a pose

To assume a dramatic or exaggerated bodily attitude or position, as for a photograph or portrait. After the serious wedding photos were finished, everyone struck a silly pose for a funny picture. I always feel awkward striking a pose for these publicity shots. It always feels so forced.
See also: pose, strike

strike an attitude

To assume a dramatic or exaggerated bodily attitude or position, as for a photograph or portrait. After the serious wedding photos were finished, everyone struck a silly attitude for a funny picture. I always feel awkward striking an attitude for these publicity shots. It always feels so forced.
See also: attitude, strike

wait-and-see attitude

A hesitant, skeptical, or circumspect mindset or outlook. The boss has always had a wait-and-see attitude when it comes to new market opportunities, which can be maddening when you're trying to tap into a fresh revenue stream. My wife likes to jump into every wild idea as soon as she's had it, whereas I have more of a wait-and-see attitude about things.
See also: attitude

with attitude

Especially intense, impressive, or demanding of attention. She has now built an entire media empire on being a nanny with attitude, one who won't tolerate the bad behavior of children or parents alike. It's not quite rock climbing—more like hiking with attitude.
See also: attitude
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cop an attitude

Sl. to take a negative or opposite attitude about something. My teenage son copped an attitude when I asked why he seemed to be sneaking around.
See also: attitude, cop

devil-may-care attitude

 and devil-may-care manner
a very casual attitude; a worry-free or carefree attitude. You must get rid of your devil-may-care attitude if you want to succeed. She acts so thoughtless—with her devil-may-care manner.
See also: attitude

have a bad attitude

to have a negative outlook on things; to be uncooperative. Perry has a bad attitude and has nothing positive to contribute to the conversation.
See also: attitude, bad, have

strike a pose

to position oneself in a certain posture. Bob struck a pose in front of the mirror to see how much he had bulked up. Lisa walked into the room and struck a pose, hoping she would be noticed.
See also: pose, strike

wait-and-see attitude

Fig. a skeptical attitude; an uncertain attitude in which someone will just wait to see what happens before reacting. John thought that Mary couldn't do it, but he took a wait-and-see attitude. His wait-and-see attitude seemed to indicate that he didn't really care what happened.
See also: attitude
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

with attitude

If you describe a thing as something or someone with attitude, you mean that they are more impressive or confident than a normal example of that thing. This is going to be sailing with attitude. Patti Smith and Janis Joplin were women with attitude and talent.
See also: attitude
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

strike a ˈpose/an ˈattitude

sit, stand or lie in a position in order to attract attention: He was striking a pose, leaning against the ship’s rail.
See also: attitude, pose, strike
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

attitude-adjuster

n. a police officer’s nightstick; any club. Andy had a black attitude-adjuster hanging from his belt, and I wasn’t going to argue with him.

cop an attitude

tv. to take a negative or opposite attitude about something. (see also tude.) I think you’re copping an attitude. Not advised, dude. Not advised.
See also: attitude, cop

pull an attitude

tv. to be haughty; to put on airs. Don’t pull an attitude with me, chum!
See also: attitude, pull
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
If employees perceive a drug-testing program to be unfair, or unjust, it is predicted that they will react attitudinally with moral outrage and righteousness, or behaviorally with efforts to change or beat the system (Bies, 1987; Crant & Bateman, 1989; Folger, 1986; Mark & Folger, 1984).
It is also incumbent on student affairs professionals, in particular university counselors, to be knowledgeable about the potential stigma and core Korean American cultural values that need to be incorporated both behaviorally and attitudinally into the counseling process.
Being a hunter/shooter is more attitudinally based and involves development over time of an individual's perception of him/herself as a hunter/shooter and as part of a hunting/shooting culture.
In comparison, Milan's work is diaristic, also invested in problems of race, sexuality, and history, but attitudinally frisky.
Children become attitudinally susceptible to smoking in response to social influences, including people they observe modeling the behavior in their social environment.
Since Missouri is a microcosm attitudinally, as well as demographically, it is probable that the responses to this question for the state would be similar to the country as a whole.
We are told that the poor are a homogenous group in America, but they are homogenous neither behaviorally nor attitudinally.
A guiding interpretative frame has been that substance abusers are more or less attitudinally, spatially and temporally distant to the treatment system, and that this distance influence willingness to engage in treatment and to change lifestyle.
arrogance--whether reflected attitudinally (in the news pages) or
Slower responses to step three's attitudinally "unfamiliar" pairs (Disabled Athlete--Pleasant and Able-Bodied Athlete--Unpleasant) than to step five's familiar pairs (Disabled Athlete--Unpleasant and Able-Bodied Athlete--Pleasant) imply that the unfamiliar pairs are harder to retrieve.2 In contrast, the faster responses to the familiar pairs imply that these pairs are more easily associated and are easier to identify.
True survey methodology can test product concept, but only attitudinally. Survey methodology, intended to generalize, can not feasibly assess products, at the level of real user product interaction.
Employees self-reported on the items in the questionnaire, as all variables in the study are considered to be perceptual and/or attitudinally related.
(29) However it will only be effective if providers are orientated attitudinally towards providing information and empowering girls needing contraception.
Marketers find this consumer group to be highly individualistic and diverse-- ethnically, culturally, and attitudinally (17).
A segment may be defined in various ways (demographically, psychographically, attitudinally, behaviorally) but is always a group of consumers who currently or potentially value the brand idea.