at risk


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at risk

1. In danger. Well, when you're involved in a pyramid scheme, you're at risk for losing a lot of money. Because I have poor vision, I'm worried that my daughter is at risk for it too.
2. Responsible for a cost or expense. If you sign this contract, you'll be at risk for a lot of fees.
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*at risk

in a situation where there is risk or hazard; in danger. (*Typically: be ~; put someone or something ~.) I refuse to put my family's welfare at risk by quitting my job. Your whole future is at risk if you don't stop smoking.
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at risk

1. In danger, as in Their house's location on the San Andreas Fault puts them at risk in the next major earthquake . [c. 1900]
2. Legally responsible to pay for loss or damage, as in If he can't keep up with the insurance premiums, he is at risk for any liability claims on the property . [Late 1700s]
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at ˈrisk (from/of something)

in danger of something unpleasant or harmful happening: As with all diseases, certain groups will be more at risk than others.If we go to war, innocent lives will be put at risk.
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at risk

In an endangered state, especially from lack of proper care: unsupervised children who are at risk of dropping out of school.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, in a study of 83 people with mental illness receiving partial hospitalization services, knowledge of HIV/AIDS was weakly correlated with frequency of at risk behaviors (Steiner, Lussier, & Rosenblatt, 1992).
Thus, although the transactions left Whitmire "at risk" in a technical sense, the numerous contingencies placed between a potentially unprofitable transaction and any real chance he would ever suffer a loss was reflected by the number of events that would have to take place prior to his realizing financial harm.
"If you're at risk of diabetes, it's best to maintain a low-fat diet because all fats are calorie-dense."
Millions of people travel internationally each year, for both pleasure and business, and thus may be at risk for being infected by animals and causing infections in animals.
Even if such a failure were to occur, however, it is unlikely to place taxpayers at risk. The Bank Insurance Fund could be placed at risk if insured commercial banks failed to prudently manage their counterparty credit exposures to the failed derivatives dealer.
A growing number of studies point to HDL levels--and especially the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol--as a superior gauge for spotting people at risk of artery-clogging heart disease.
Although there is no clear breakdown as to how much identity theft involves computer break-ins as opposed to "traditional" thievery, there is no doubt that technology has increased the amount of confidential information at risk. Two of the newest tools of identity thieves are "phishing" and "spyware."
The greater the number of individuals who are partially protected, the smaller the pool of susceptible individuals who are at risk of infection.
Although Americans who perceive themselves to be at risk for HIV or who have engaged in high-risk behaviors are more likely than others to have ever been tested, substantial proportions of individuals in either of these categories--39% of whites, 35% of similar Hispanics and 26% of blacks-have never been tested for the virus.
Moreover, the question of derivatives can be an end in itself: Those with some interest--be it financial, regulatory, fiduciary or otherwise--in an entity that uses them can better understand whether and how that enduser is at risk.
"Companies need to revisit the level of information they collect about exposures, understand what is insured and how those risks are correlated to each other." Fundamentally, he says, a company needs to understand: what it is insuring, what its liabilities are, what exposures on its balance sheet might be at risk from a specific type of event, what insurance and reinsurance coverage it has, where that is located and how the potential losses correlate to its insurance for business activities, business interruption, properties and life.
Companies are using value at risk or VAR (effect of unlikely events in normal markets), and stress testing (effect of plausible events in abnormal markets) methodologies to measure the potential impact of the financial risks they face.
Companies frequently use simulation to measure their financial risk exposure - their so-called "value at risk" - to underlying factors such as exchange rates, interest rates or commodity prices, and then consistently aggregate these exposures across risk factors, business units and geographic business location.
Most recently, industry leaders have begun to take a more holistic view of risk, capital and return by implementing enterprise-risk models based on methodologies such as dynamic financial analysis (DFA), value at risk (VaR) and risk-adjusted return on capital (RAROC), reports Risk Management Solutions, Newark, Calif., a leading provider of catastrophe models.