at one time


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Related to at one time: at the same time

at one time

1. At the same time; in unison. Don't try to carry more than two boxes at one time—they're heavy! I can't understand a word with all of you screaming at one time.
2. In the past. Yes, I was a teacher at one time, long before I became a fashion designer.
See also: one, time

at one time

1. Simultaneously, at the same time, as in All the boys jumped into the pool at one time. For synonyms, see at once, def. 1; at the same time, def. 1.
2. Formerly, in the past, as in At one time very few houses in town were on the market.
See also: one, time

at one time

1. Simultaneously.
2. At a period or moment in the past.
See also: one, time
References in classic literature ?
I do not like speaking about myself, as may have been noticed, but in the cause of humanity I on this occasion will do so, and will confess that at one time I was, as the young man in the Bab Ballad says, "the shyest of the shy," and "whenever I was introduced to any pretty maid, my knees they knocked together just as if I was afraid.
Indeed, their conduct in war, to the inexperienced observer, is full of inconsistencies; at one time they are headlong in courage, and heedless of danger; at another time cautious almost to cowardice.
At one time, when pursuing a war party by their tracks across the prairies, he repeatedly discharged his rifle into the prints made by their feet and by the hoofs of their horses, assuring his followers that he would thereby cripple the fugitives, so that they would easily be overtaken.
At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.
At one time of the day, the two shores, both of which are extremely low, could just be distinguished from the deck.
It was more money than he had ever possessed at one time.
I must say, that if such a prospect of work had presented itself at first, when I began to feel the approach of my miserable circumstances--I say, had such a prospect of getting my bread by working presented itself then, I had never fallen into this wicked trade, or into such a wicked gang as I was now embarked with; but practice had hardened me, and I grew audacious to the last degree; and the more so because I had carried it on so long, and had never been taken; for, in a word, my new partner in wickedness and I went on together so long, without being ever detected, that we not only grew bold, but we grew rich, and we had at one time one-and-twenty gold watches in our hands.
At one time she would come on board with a jar of pickles for the steward's pantry; another time with a bunch of quills for the chief mate's desk, where he kept his log; a third time with a roll of flannel for the small of some one's rheumatic back.