at it


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Related to at it: Have at it

at it

1. Involved in an action, activity, or pursuit vigorously, exhaustively, or determinedly. I studied really hard for this test; I was at it all night. I wish those dogs would quit barking, they've been at it since the sun came up!
2. slang Engaging in sex. I can always hear when the neighbors are at it. It's really embarrassing!

at it

Vigorously pursuing an activity, especially a fight, but also sex or some other activity. For example, Whenever they play bridge they really go at it (fight), or The new job keeps Tom at it day and night (works hard), or In the spring the dogs are always at it (sex). Shakespeare used this seemingly modern idiom for "fighting" in Troilus and Cressida (5:3): "They are at it, hark!" [Late 1500s]

at it

engaged in some activity, typically a reprehensible one.
1993 G. F. Newman Law & Order Oh, don't take me for a complete idiot, Jack. I know you're at it.

at it

Informal
Engaged in verbal or physical conflict; arguing or fighting: The neighbors are at it again.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was like a car crash: you couldn't look at it and you couldn't look away.
I had a couple beers and was feeling sassy, so I took a deck and had a go at it. Ever seen a drunk, fat man try to skateboard for the first time?
You could look at it from a gender viewpoint as well, because the SQUID disks tend to highlight male fantasies, not female ones.
The National Demolition Association is ushering in some major changes at its 32nd annual gathering, including the formal announcement of its name change from the National Association of Demolition Contractors (NADC) and the unveiling of its new logo.
History doesn't give us many examples of an idea being played out benignly and at its best.
At its worst, it's that paternalism: "I don't need it, but look at all these childish people around me.
But church, at its best, can bring people together the way no other institution can.
None of them has at its core a sense of the promise and disappointment of every life.
Only a few years ago, Bill Gates was the poster boy for American entrepreneurialism at its finest, and Microsoft as the upstart David to IBM's Goliath.
I see them up on stage with that kind of beautiful exuberance, and I'm like, `Oh, that is so what I could feel like.' In return, I teach them--`Oh, that's normal for a record company to do, blah blah blah' or `That's good, just move the chorus here.' It's reciprocity at its finest, because it's trading of wisdoms and trading of energies.
So it should come as no surprise to find that they're waiting for us at its end--its completion, its fullfillment, perhaps is absolescence--as well.
The years when the Austin music scene was at its peak, I was the guy who wouldn't go see a band because I would be showing a film at the local society.