at a loose end


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Related to at a loose end: at a loss, get the ball rolling, in terms of

at a loose end

Having nothing to do, often resulting in boredom. Primarily heard in Australia. Connie is at a loose end because she finished all of her chores early. My plans were canceled, so I'm at a loose end now.
See also: end, loose

at a loose end

BRITISH or

at loose ends

AMERICAN
If you are at a loose end, you have some spare time and you feel rather bored because you do not have anything particular to do. The school summer holidays had just started and I was already at a loose end. If you're ever at a loose end, I'm at Danilo's most lunchtimes, so drop by if you feel like it. Note: This expression may refer to the ropes on a sailing ship. The ends of the ropes had to be tightly bound to stop them fraying, and sailors were often given this job to do when there was nothing more urgent to be done. Alternatively, the expression may refer to a working horse being untied at the end of the day and released into a field. Compare with loose ends.
See also: end, loose

at a loose end

having nothing to do; not knowing what to do.
A North American variant of this expression is at loose ends .
See also: end, loose

at a loose ˈend

(British English) (American English at loose ˈends) having nothing to do; not knowing what to do: I’m at a bit of a loose end this afternoon. Do you fancy a game of tennis?
See also: end, loose