damn by association

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damn by association

To condemn, vilify, or discredit someone or something due to an association with a particular person, group, or thing. The multinational corporation was damned by association when it came to light that an employee of one of its subsidiaries belonged to a white supremacist organization. After the terrorist attack, many people were quick to damn by association anyone who belonged to the same faith as the terrorists.
See also: by, damn
References in classic literature ?
'That the said proposal has received the sanction and approval of this Association.
'That this Association cordially recognises the principle of every member of the Corresponding Society defraying his own travelling expenses; and that it sees no objection whatever to the members of the said society pursuing their inquiries for any length of time they please, upon the same terms.
Dempsey was the leader of the association. He wore a dress suit, and could chin the bar twice with one hand.
Two other members of the Give and Take Association swiftly joined the little group.
It is a kind of assemblage of societies that constitute a new one, capable of increasing, by means of new associations, till they arrive to such a degree of power as to be able to provide for the security of the united body."
Are you of the number of those to whom such associations give no pleasure?"
"If your world is a world without associations, Mr.
It seems that when I went North with General Armstrong to speak at the series of public meetings to which I have referred, the President of the National Educational Association, the Hon.
On the evening that I spoke before the Association there must have been not far from four thousand persons present.
On the morrow after this conversation every member of the association received a sealed circular couched in the following terms:
Some intense associations of a most distressing nature were vividly recalled, I think.
Pitched battles had been fought with the small armies of armed strike-breakers* put in the field by the employers' associations; the Black Hundreds, appearing in scores of wide-scattered places, had destroyed property; and, in consequence, a hundred thousand regular soldiers of the United States has been called out to put a frightful end to the whole affair.
The great captains of industry, the oligarchs, had for the first time thrown their full weight into the breach the struggling employers' associations had made.
John, white robes are given to the redeemed, and the four-and-twenty elders stand clothed in white before the great white throne, and the Holy One that sitteth there white like wool; yet for all these accumulated associations, with whatever is sweet, and honorable, and sublime, there yet lurks an elusive something in the innermost idea of this hue, which strikes more of panic to the soul than that redness which affrights in blood.
This elusive quality it is, which causes the thought of whiteness, when divorced from more kindly associations, and coupled with any object terrible in itself, to heighten that terror to the furthest bounds.
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