associate with

(redirected from associate yourself with)

associate with

1. To have a relationship with someone. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun can be used between "associate" and "with." I don't associate with criminals like him. I think he's happy to associate himself with successful people like us.
2. To connect various people or things in one's mind, usually for a specific reason that is unique to that person. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "associate" and "with." I associate the smell of cinnamon with Christmas because of the cookies my mother used to bake every year. He always associates Liz with me because he met us at the same time.
See also: associate

associate oneself with someone or something

to join someone or something as a partner or friend. I wanted to associate myself with a prestigious law firm. She associated herself with people of low repute.
See also: associate

associate someone or something with someone or something

to link someone or something [in one's mind] to someone or something else. (Something and someone can occur in all possible combinations.) I always associate Walter with pizza for some reason. I associate pizza with stringy cheese.
See also: associate

associate with someone

to be friendly with someone; to be acquainted with someone socially in a work setting. We seek to associate with persons like ourselves. I like to associate with interesting people.
See also: associate

associate with

v.
1. To keep company with someone or some group: They are very snobbish and don't associate with people from our side of town.
2. To link something in the mind with something else: People often associate sunny weather with happiness.
See also: associate
References in classic literature ?
In accompanying me you will associate yourself with many risks.
Washington said, 'Associate yourself with people of good quality, for it is better to be alone than in bad company.' There is absolutely a limit to what a leader can achieve alone.
"Associate yourself with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for 'tis better to be alone than in bad company." a George Washington
Yet the same people who urge that, in private, often tell their loved ones the opposite: Be more "discerning." At work and in your personal life, you're wiser to try to associate yourself with people at least as bright, motivated, and ethical as you are.
"To associate yourself with violence or to give a reason for the violence to occur more, this was the reason we got into dialect with them many times to stop this.
"Having chosen this university, you already make a certain choice of your future profession, you associate yourself with work in the agro-industrial complex.
But the chances are that people have seen the template before, so you tend to associate yourself with last presentations other than being exceptional.
European 10,000m champion Jo Pavey, 41, said: "As an athlete, you don't want to associate yourself with people that have got accusations and allegations against them.
As Redniss puts it: "Great programming can come on any screen, and if you want to associate yourself with great storytelling as a brand, you don't have to look at just broadcast or cable TV."
Conveying their shock at the concept of this advertisement, they wrote: "We, therefore, urge you to do the right thing -- cease to associate yourself with this offensive image by ensuring that further use of this advertisement is stopped."
"They don't allow you as a survivor to go among them, to associate yourself with them.
Mr George said: "That is not only an insult to the dead and injured, it is complete rubbish, isn't it, Mr Eason, and you wouldn't associate yourself with that, would you?" Mr Eason said no and admitted the ambulance service had a "delayed response."
This is not a film worth watching and the only thing I got out of it is to be careful who you associate yourself with and if your sixth sense tells you that there is something wrong with this situation, get out of there quickly.
So, associate yourself with a successful equity investor who can accelerate your development and give you credibility," he advised.
It's not a question of who or how many had their feelings hurt, but whether you want to associate yourself with a word that, for whatever historical reason having nothing to do with you, carries inherently derogatory connotations.
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