assimilate (oneself/someone/something) into

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assimilate (oneself/someone/something) into

To blend into; to merge with. Can you please help assimilate our new student into the class? I've assimilated your suggestions into the existing curriculum. Do you think Sam will be able to assimilate himself into the group? He can be pretty standoffish.
See also: assimilate, someone

assimilate someone or something into something

to cause someone or something to be absorbed into something. (As when a person or thing joins a group.) We sought to assimilate Arnold into the community. The manager had to assimilate the new policies into the list of current ones. They assimilated themselves into the general population.
See also: assimilate
References in classic literature ?
Very likely," says the doctor: "I have known people eat in a fever; and it is very easily accounted for; because the acidity occasioned by the febrile matter may stimulate the nerves of the diaphragm, and thereby occasion a craving which will not be easily distinguishable from a natural appetite; but the aliment will not be concreted, nor assimilated into chyle, and so will corrode the vascular orifices, and thus will aggravate the febrific symptoms.
1 : to become or cause to become part of a different group or country <She was completely assimilated into her new country.
The bigger debate, then, is about more than veils; it's about the extent to which Muslims have (or haven't) assimilated into British society, and what to do about it.
The other two titles, "Women's History Review" (4x) and "Women's Writing" (3x), will be assimilated into T&F Group's Arts and Humanities and Social Science sections, respectively.
If we take Anglo-Protestantism as the root of American national identity, we have to consider European Catholicism, which we all consider fully assimilated into whatever the American identity may be.
Yancey draws from the work of Milton Gordon and his theorizations of structural, marital, civic, and identificational assimilation to explore how readily minority groups can become assimilated into the dominant society, identify with majority group status, and adopt social attitudes that benefit dominant group members.
The underlying assumption of the government of this period was that the American Indians were to be assimilated into the American culture of individual property, agrarian production and Christianity.
They said Taweel had assimilated into American culture and opened his home to the elder Tawil's daughter, Vilma Tawil, who had run away from home and sought shelter with her cousin.
Of course, Barnett allows, being assimilated into the Global Core "does not mean bad things will never happen to you.
According to Mendes-Flohr, in order to properly enter the worldview of the Literatenjuden it is necessary to challenge two commonly held assumptions: (1) German Jews had confidently and unabashedly assimilated into German culture of the nineteenth- and twentieth- centuries; and (2) this assimilation precluded any continued commitment to Judaism or Jewish identity.
We shouldn't recruit only those from the minority communities who have been fully assimilated into the majority culture.
Trow's book documents the collapse of a dominant class; Harris' is an unsentimental eulogy for a vanishing ethnicity, one that's been assimilated into commercial culture at the expense of its defining characteristics.
Some are fully assimilated into mainstream America; others have just begun that process.
The business will be assimilated into Textile Services' existing plant and operations at Batavia, NY.
Taweel had assimilated into American culture and opened his home to the suspect's daughter, Vilma Tawil, who had run away from home and sought shelter with her cousin.