assimilate


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assimilate (oneself/someone/something) into

To blend into; to merge with. Can you please help assimilate our new student into the class? I've assimilated your suggestions into the existing curriculum. Do you think Sam will be able to assimilate himself into the group? He can be pretty standoffish.
See also: assimilate, someone

assimilate with

To blend harmoniously into a group of people. Do you think he will be able to assimilate with his new class? He can be pretty standoffish. My sister is really outgoing, so she has no trouble assimilating with new people.
See also: assimilate

assimilate someone or something into something

to cause someone or something to be absorbed into something. (As when a person or thing joins a group.) We sought to assimilate Arnold into the community. The manager had to assimilate the new policies into the list of current ones. They assimilated themselves into the general population.
See also: assimilate

assimilate with some people

to join or mix in with people and become accepted by them. It's easy for Karen to assimilate with new people. I want to assimilate rapidly with the other people in my class.
See also: assimilate, people
References in periodicals archive ?
High-resolution domains may often have limited traditional above-surface observational data to assimilate due to their limited size, and aircraft-based observations provide a promising potential source to better initialize such forecasts.
In the treatment of removal of lower leaves of cab, TGW was decreased due to the deficiency of assimilates. It can be said that upper leaves of cab, particularly the leaves closer to cab, had the greatest effect on TGW.
Under the settlement, ASSIMILATE acknowledges that it used code and design elements from Cyborg in its SCRATCH product and apologises for such use.
Her conclusion, if not read carefully, may insinuate that the Kurds had better assimilate in the respective states in which they reside.
At work, due to the extra pressure to assimilate, the need for discretion is paramount.
Either we assimilate non-natives or they assimilate us.
Co-written by Larry Ullman and Marc Liyanage (professional trainers of software engineers), Visual Quickstart Guide: C Programming is a text specifically intended for beginning to intermediate-level programmers who need to assimilate the basics of programming in C as swiftly as possible.
In these enclaves, they retain many aspects of Mexican culture and assimilate into American society at a slower rate than previous ethnic groups did; Mexican-Americans have been relatively slow to become citizens, and their children continue to underperform academically.
Even so, allow your foreign counterpart time to comprehend and assimilate the English language.
Trainees with low efficacy remain stagnant in their cognitive development due to their inability to assimilate and/or accommodate information from new experiences (Ronnestad & Skovholt, (1993), Birk, (1972), and Arbuckle, (1965).
Kaplan and his colleagues modified one of those models to better assimilate ocean-temperature data, and they calibrated it using temperature trends between 1980 and 2000.
The least he could do - whilst retaining his English character and identity if he wishes - is to have the courtesy to recognise that Wales is Wales,and to assimilate,at least outwardly,by learning our language and integrating.
"No matter how hard you try to assimilate a game situation in training, it is better to play games like the one we had against Teesside.
It was hypothesized that of the three plant species, algae (Cladophora sp.), which is free flowing and can attach to rocks, gravel, etc., will assimilate a greater amount of nutrients than the aquatic plant species, (Myriophyllum sp.), or the deeply rooted aquatic plant species (Vallisneria sp.).
Buchanan also cites evidence showing the high rate of crimes among immigrant populations and their failure to assimilate to American society.